Trana, Trāṇa: 20 definitions

Introduction:

Trana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Nighantu (Synonyms and Characteristics of Drugs and technical terms)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Trāṇā (त्राणा) is another name for Trāyamāṇā, a medicinal plant identified with Gentiana kurroo Royle. from the Gentianaceae family of flowering plants, according to verse 5.57-59 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fifth chapter (parpaṭādi-varga) of this book enumerates sixty varieties of smaller plants (kṣudra-kṣupa). Together with the names Trāṇā and Trāyamāṇā, there are a total of sixteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Trāṇa (त्राण) refers to “salvation”, according to the Ṭīkā (commentary) on the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “In this way (from the top of the head) up to the location of the (left) toe (the body measures) eighty-four fingers. Then, above that, there (is a space measuring) twelve fingers in the three energies. In this way (it extends for) ninety-six fingers. That is the End of the Twelve (dvādaśānta). Then above that is the Transmental (manonmanī). It has the quality of reflection (manana) and salvation (trāṇa). It is above the End of the Twelve (dvādaśānta) and measures twelve fingers. In this way, (adding) both ninety-six and twelve fingers together, makes one hundred and eight. That is the End of the Sixteen (ṣoḍaśānta)”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Trāṇa (त्राण) refers to “(one who) protects” and is used to describe Śiva, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 22.10cd-13]—“The leader [Śiva] of these [mantras] is eternal, restraining, untroubled, unexpanding, without appearance, and causes protection. He does all, he protects (trāṇa) the trembling minds [of those who are afraid of saṃsāra]. He leads. From [Śiva's] leading, [the practitioner] shall attain liberation from great fear. Thus, [the mantra] is called “netra”, because [it] protects. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Trāṇa (त्राण) refers to “salvation”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XXXII-XXXIV).—Accordingly, “... From the absolute point of view (paramārtha), the true nature (bhūtalakṣaṇa) of things, there are no beings (sattva) and there is no salvation (trāṇa). It is merely conventionally that we affirm the existence of salvation. As for you, you seek the absolute (paramārtha) in the conventional (saṃvṛti), which is inadmissible. It is as if you were looking for a precious pearl (maṇiratna) in a brick or a stone: never would you find it there.”.

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Trāṇa (त्राण) [=Trāṇakaraṇa?] refers to a “protector” [?], according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly: “[...] Having bowed to the feet of the Tathāgata, Siṃha and Siṃhavikrāntagāmin, the noble ones who are skilled in the meaning of the dharma, uttered these verses: ‘(174) Since you are the refuge, the protector, and the last resort (śaraṇa-parāyaṇa-trāṇa-karaṇa), you has become the light for the blind in the world and are expert in knowing the thoughts and actions of living beings. May you make them live in accordance with their faith. (175) This king longs for riches and happiness, is captivated by form, sound, and smell, never makes any offering, and does not even come to the nearness [of the Tathāgata.] How could he hear the dharma?. [...]’”.

Source: De Gruyter: A Buddhist Ritual Manual on Agriculture

Trāṇa (त्राण) refers to “defence”, according to the Vajratuṇḍasamayakalparāja, an ancient Buddhist ritual manual on agriculture from the 5th-century (or earlier), containing various instructions for the Sangha to provide agriculture-related services to laypeople including rain-making, weather control and crop protection.—Accordingly, [After Viṣṇudatta attempted to enchant a Nāga]: “[...] The Nāga in great pain threw a great fire rain shower upon the Brahmin’s body enveloping it. The Brahmin discontinued the fire oblation, became defenceless, deprived of a refuge and last resort (aparāyaṇa) and there was nobody to save him. He started to cry out seeking refuge (śaraṇa), defence (trāṇa) and a last resort (parāyaṇa) at the Bhagavān. [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Trāṇa (त्राण) refers to “protection” (for the embodied soul), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Fool, there is no embodied soul in the three worlds for whom the noose of Yama (i.e. the god of death) will not stretch on [their] neck.—[com.—Next he says that there is not any (na ko'pi) protection (trāṇam) for the embodied soul (jīvasya)]—The sentient being descends into the path of Yama’s lion which is irresistible. He certainly is not protected even by the energetic 30”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

trāṇa (त्राण).—n (S) Protection or preservation. 2 Salvation, preservation from hell. 3 A vehement effort; straining at with all one's might. 4 Storming and stamping; kicking and tossing about furiously. 5 Remaining strength, vigor, goodness, soundness, substance, mettle, pluck (in a worn garment or used article or infirm person or animal): also strength or substance (in an article, person, or animal gen.)

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

trāṇa (त्राण).—n Protection or preservation. Salva- tion. A vehement effort, straining at with all one's might. Remaining strength, vigour, goodness, soundness, substance, mettle, pluck (in a worn garment or used article or infirm person or animal); also strength or substance (in an article, person, animal gen.).

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Trāṇa (त्राण).—&c. See under त्रै (trai).

See also (synonyms): trāta.

--- OR ---

Trāṇa (त्राण).—p. p. [trai karmaṇi kta, bhāve lyuṭ vā] Protected, guarded, preserved, saved.

-ṇam 1 Protection, defence, preservation; आर्तत्राणाय वः शस्त्रं न प्रहर्तुमनागसि (ārtatrāṇāya vaḥ śastraṃ na prahartumanāgasi) Ś.1.11; R.15.3; Mālatīmādhava (Bombay) 9.26.

2) Shelter, help, refuge.

3) Protecting, preserving.

4) An armour.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Trāṇa (त्राण).—mfn.

(-ṇaḥ-ṇā-ṇaṃ) 1. Preserved, saved, guarded, protected. n.

(-ṇaṃ) 1. Preserving, protection. 2. A plant: see trāyamāṇa. E. trai to preserve, affix kta and ṇa optionally substiluted ta; also trāta; again, trai to preserve, affix bhāve lyuṭa .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Trāṇa (त्राण).—i. e. trā + ana, n. 1. Shelter, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 11, 113. 2. Protection, Mahābhārata 3, 13284.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Trāṇa (त्राण).—[neuter] = seq. + armour, mail.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Trāṇa (त्राण):—[from trā] mfn. protected, [Pāṇini 8-2, 56]

2) [v.s. ...] n. protecting, preserving, protection, defence, shelter, help (often ifc.), [Chāndogya-upaniṣad; Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] protection for the body, armour, helmet etc., [iii, 12092]

4) [v.s. ...] = trāyamāṇā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Trāṇā (त्राणा):—[from trāṇa > trā] f. idem, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Trāṇa (त्राण):—[from trā] cf. aṅguli-, udara-, urasetc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Trāṇa (त्राण):—[(ṇaḥ-ṇā-ṇaṃ) a.] Preserved, saved. n. Preservation, salvation.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Trāṇa (त्राण) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Tāṇa, Tāyaṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Trana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Trāṇa (त्राण) [Also spelled tran]:—(nm) protection; means of protection, defence; shelter; salvation; ~[kartā] protector, saviour; ~[kārī] protector/protecting; saviour/saving; ~[dātā] see [trātā].

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Trāṇa (ತ್ರಾಣ):—

1) [noun] the act of protecting or a being protected.

2) [noun] the quality or state of being strong; the capacity for exertion and endurance.

3) [noun] a metal armour or leather coat, covering for protection of the body or any part of the body.

4) [noun] a man who protects, guards another or anything against danger.

5) [noun] the maximum bearing capacity of a ship.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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