Toshala, Tosala, Tośala, Toṣala: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Toshala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Tośala and Toṣala can be transliterated into English as Tosala or Toshala, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Tośala (तोशल).—A Malla friend consulted by Kaṃsa. He had his seat allocated in the arena; was killed by Kṛṣṇa.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 36. 21; 42. 37; 44. 27; Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 20. 79-80.

1b) A Vindhyan tribe.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 64.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Tosala (तोसल) is the name of a country situated within the Dākṣiṇāpatha (Deccan) region. Countries within this region pertain to the Dākṣinātyā local usage (pravṛtti) according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 14. These pravṛttis provide information regarding costumes, languages, and manners in different countries of the world. It is mentioned this region lies between the Southern Ocean and the Vindhya mountains.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Toshala in Kavya glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara

Toṣala (तोषल) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—This is identified with Dakṣinākośala, because Toṣala is mentioned in the Aśoka inscription at Dhauli. In Kāvyamīmāṃsā, Rājaśekhara includes this region among the eastern countries of India.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Tosala (तोसल) is the name of an ancient kingdom, according to chapter 4.2 [vāsupūjya-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly, as Vasupūjya and Jayā spoke to Vāsupūjya:—“All the existing kings, among men and the Vidyādharas, who are of good family, capable, heroic, wealthy, famous, possessing the fourfold army, known for guarding their subjects, free from blemish, faithful to engagements, always devoted to dharma, in Madhyadeśa, Vatsadeśa, [... the Tosalas, ...] these now, son, beg us constantly through messengers, who are sent bearing valuable gifts, to give their daughters to you. [...]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Tosala (तोसल).—N.L. Dey identifies Dakṣiṇa Kosala with Tosalī of Aśoka's inscription (Tosala) at Dhauli, which is situated near Bhuvaneśwar in the Puri district, Orissa. Als see Kosala: a place-name without suffix and is mentioned in the Gupta inscription No. 1. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.

The country of Tosala also, like Kosala, had two divisions: Uttara Tosala and Dakṣiṇa Tosala. Dakṣiṇa Tosala consisted of a maṇḍala of the name of Koṅgoda. In some cases by mistake the reading Dakṣiṇa kosala is given in place of Dakṣiṇa Tosala. But it is clear from other evidence that Tosala and Kosala were two separate entities.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Toṣala (तोषल).—A club (musala).

Derivable forms: toṣalam (तोषलम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Tosala (तोसल).—nt., name of a city in the country of Amita- tosala, q.v.: Gaṇḍavyūha 179.3. Cf. Tosala as name of a people, Kirfel 76, and AVPariś.56.1.4.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Tosala (तोसल):—m. [plural] Name of a people, [Atharva-veda.Pariś. lvi, 4]

2) sg. Name of a wrestler (also laka), [Harivaṃśa ii, 30, 48 ff.; Bhāgavata-purāṇa x, 36; 42; 44, 27.]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Toṣala (तोषल):—m. nom. gent. [Harivaṃśa 4736.] toṣalaka [4734. 4741.] — Vgl. tosala .

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Tosala (तोसल):—m. nom. gent. [Pariśiṣṭa des Atharvaveda] in [Weber’s Verzeichniss 93.] — Vgl. toṣala und [Weber’s Indische Studien 3, 169. fg.]

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Tośala (तोशल):—m. Nomen proprium eines Mannes [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 10, 42, 37.] ka [36, 21. 44, 27.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Tośala (तोशल):—und ka m. v.l. für tosala 2).

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Toṣala (तोषल):—und ka m. v.l. für tosala 2).

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Tosala (तोसल):—m. Nomen proprium —

1) Pl. eines Volkes. —

2) eines Ringers [Harivaṃśa 2,30,50.] ka [48,55.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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