Tivra, Tīvra, Tīvrā: 14 definitions

Introduction

Tivra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Tīvrā (तीव्रा, “sharp”):—Name of one of the sixty-four mātṛs to be worshipped during Āvaraṇapūjā (“Worship of the Circuit of Goddesses”, or “Durgā’s Retinue”), according to the Durgāpūjātattva. They should be worshipped with either the five upācāras or perfume and flowers.

Her mantra is as follows:

ॐ तीव्रायै नमः
oṃ tīvrāyai namaḥ.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

1) Tīvrā (तीव्रा) is another name for Rājasarṣapa, which is a Sanskrit word referring to Brassica nigra (black mustard), from the Brassicaceae family. Certain plant parts of Rājasarṣapa are eaten as a vegetable (śāka), according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Ayurvedic work. The synonym was identified in the Rājanighaṇṭu (verse 16.121), which is a 13th-century medicinal thesaurus.

2) Tīvrā (तीव्रा) is another name for Tulasī, which is a Sanskrit word referring to Ocimum tenuiflorum (holy basil), from the Lamiaceae family. It is classified as a medicinal plant in the system of Āyurveda (science of Indian medicine) and is used throughout literature such as the Suśrutasaṃhita and the Carakasaṃhitā. The synonym was identified in the Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 10.148-149), which is a 13th-century medicinal thesaurus.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Tīvrā (तीव्रा) is another name for Tejovatī, a medicinal plant similar to Jyotiṣmatī Celastrus paniculatus (black oil plant or intellect tree) from the Celastraceae or “staff vine” or “bittersweet family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.82 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The Raj Nighantu reads Jyotiṣmatī and Tejovatī together while Bāpālāl identifies Tejovatī with Zanthoxylum budrunga (cape yellowwood or Indian ivy-rue) from the Rutaceae or “rue” or “citrus” family. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Tīvrā and Tejovatī, there are a total of thirty-one Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Tīvrā (तीव्रा).—A Śakti.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 44. 72.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Saṅgītaśiromaṇi

Tīvrā (तीव्रा) refers to one of the first of twenty-two quarters tones (śruti) existing within an octave, according to the Saṅgīta-ratnākara (“ocean of music and dance”). This work is an important Sanskrit treatise dealing with ancient Indian musicology (gāndharva-śāstra), composed by Śārṅgadeva in the 13th century and deals with both Carnatic and Hindustani music. Tīvrā has a frequency of 470.9260Hz.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: archive.org: Illustrations of Indian Music and Dance in Western Indian Style

Tīvrā (तीव्रा, “fierce”).—Illustration of Tīvrā-śruti according to 15th century art:—The colour of her body is yellow. She holds a vīṇā in both hands. The colour of her bodice is blue. Her scarf is red and green with a black design. Her lower garment is green with a black design. She is well ornamented.

The illustrations (of, for example Tīvrā) are found scattered throughout ancient Jain manuscripts from Gujarat. The descriptions of these illustrations of this citrāvalī are based on the ślokas of Vācanācārya Gaṇi Sudhākalaśa’s Saṅgītopaniṣatsāroddhāra (14th century) and Śārṅgadeva’s Saṅgītaratnākara (13th century).

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

tīvra (तीव्र).—a (S) Hot, biting, pungent. 2 fig. Fierce, ardent, impetuous, vehement--fire, a disposition: sharp, keen, acute--edge of a weapon, a genius: cutting, piercing, stinging--language.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

tīvra (तीव्र).—a Hot. Fig. Fierce; sharp; cutting.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Tīvra (तीव्र).—a.

1) Severe, intense, sharp, acute, violent, poignant, pungent, impetuous; विलङ्घिताधोरणतीव्रयत्नाः (vilaṅghitādhoraṇatīvrayatnāḥ) R.5.48 'strong or violent efforts' &c.; U.3.35; Ś.1. 32,5.7.

2) Hot, warm.

3) Flashing.

4) Pervading.

5) Endless, unlimited.

6) Horrible, dreadful.

-vraḥ 1 Sharpness.

2) Śiva.

-vram 1 Heat, pungency.

2) A shore.

3) Iron, steel.

4) Tin.

-vram ind. Violently, sharply, excessively.

-vrā 1 Black mustard.

2) Basil.

3) Helleborus miger (Mar. kuṭakī).

4) (in music) Name of a श्रुति (śruti).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Tīvra (तीव्र).—adj. (like Pali tibba, hardly Sanskrit, used of religiously and morally good activity), adv. tīvraṃ, zealously: mātāpitṝṣu vīro upasthapetvā tīvraṃ paricarati Mahāvastu ii.220.18 (verse), zealously waited upon (his parents).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tīvra (तीव्र).—mfn.

(-vraḥ-vrā-vraṃ) 1. Much, excessive, endless, unbounded, unlimited. 2. Pungent. 3. Hot, warm. m.

(-vraḥ) A name of Siva. f.

(-vrā) 1. A medicinal plant, Katuki. 2. Black mustard. 3. A sort of Durva or bent grass, (gaṇḍadūrvā) 4. The name of a river in the east of Bengal; also the Chandi or Padmabati. adv. n.

(-vraṃ) 1. Much, excessively, endless. 2. Violently, fiercely. subst. 1. A shore, a bank. 2. Tin. 3. Heat. 4. Pungency. E. tīv to be large, &c. rak aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tīvra (तीव्र).—[adjective] strong, violent, intense, fierce; [masculine] & † [feminine] abst.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Tīvra (तीव्र):—mf(ā)n. ([from] tiv-ra, √tu) strong, severe, violent, intense, hot, pervading, excessive, ardent, sharp, acute, pungent, horrible, [Ṛg-veda] etc.

2) m. sharpness, pungency, [Pāṇini 2-2, 8], [vArttika] 3., [Patañjali]

3) for vara (?) [gana] rājanyādi

4) Śiva

5) n. pungency, [Horace H. Wilson]

6) a shore (for 2. tīra ?), [Uṇādi-sūtra] k.

7) tin (cf. 1. tīra), [ib.]

8) steel, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) iron, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) Tīvrā (तीव्रा):—[from tīvra] f. Helleborus niger, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] black mustard, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] basil, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] gaṇḍa-dūrvā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] taradī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

15) [v.s. ...] mahā-jyotiṣmatī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

16) [v.s. ...] (in music) Name of a Śruti

17) [v.s. ...] of a Mūrchanā

18) [v.s. ...] of the river Padmavatī (in the east of Bengal), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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