Tika, Ṭīkā: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Tika means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhagavad-gita (4th edition)

Ṭīkā (टीका) refers to “commentary”. (cf. Glossary page from Śrīmad-Bhagavad-Gītā).

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Ṭīkā (टीका) is a Sanskrit word referring to a “commentary”.

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: archive.org: Tipitaka Studies Outside Myanmar

Tika (sub-commentaries) refers to a category of Buddhist literature approved by the sixth Buddhist council.—The Tikas are written mostly in the first half of the second millennium, partially by Sinhalese monks and partially by Burmese.

Source: Buddhist Information: A Heart Released

Tika means three.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

tika : (nt.) a triad. (adj.), consisting of three. || ṭīkā (f.), sub-commentary.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Tika, (adj. -n.) (Vedic trika) consisting of 3, a triad S. II, 218 (t. -bhojana); DhA. IV, 89 (-nipāta, the book of the triads, a division of the Jātaka), 108 (t. -catukka-jhāna the 3 & the 4 jhānas); Miln. 12 (tika-duka-paṭimaṇḍitā dhammasaṅganī); Vism. 13 sq.; DhsA. 39 (-duka triad & pair). (Page 301)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ṭikā (टिका).—m (tilaka S) The circular mark made with colored earths or unguents upon the forehead. 2 fig. A circular and white spot upon the forehead of a beast; as ṭikāghōḍā, ṭikābaila. ṭikā lāgaṇēṃ g. of s. (To get a mark as conspicuous as the ṭikā) To become manifest or notorious; to stand out as if imprinted upon the forehead--any deed or matter. ṭikā lāgaṇēṃ kapāḷīṃ g. of s. To incur a stigma or stain. ṭikyācā dhanī Said of a person without understanding, or without money, or without authority or influence, but to whom his situation or relative capacity enforces some outward respect.

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ṭīkā (टीका).—f (S) A commentary or comment: also an annotation or a note: also an interpretation, whether by a paraphrase or a semi-translation. As ṭīkā is especially of the Puran̤s, so bhāṣya is especially of the Sutras, although, now, bhāṣya is of the Vedas, and vṛtti of the Sutras. 2 fig. Swelling, amplifying, embellishing (of a simple matter). 3 fig. Remarking censoriously, commenting upon.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ṭikā (टिका).—m The circular mark made with colored earths or unguents upon the forehead. ṭikā lāgaṇēṃ To become mani- fest or notorious. (kapāḷīṃ) ṭikā lāgaṇēṃ To incur a stigma or stain. ṭikyācā dhanī Said of a person without authority or influence, but to whom his situation or relative capacity enforces some outward respect.

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ṭīka (टीक).—f A cluster of pearls or diamonds. Pearl or white speck on the eye.

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ṭīkā (टीका).—f A commentary or comment: also an annotation or a note. Remarking censoriously, commenting upon.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Tika (तिक).—a. Without a master; without a husband, unmarried.

-tiḥ Ved. Not a master or husband; अव भेषज पादय य इमां संविवृत्सत्यपतिः स्वपतिं स्त्रियम् (ava bheṣaja pādaya ya imāṃ saṃvivṛtsatyapatiḥ svapatiṃ striyam) Av.8.6.16.

See also (synonyms): apati.

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Ṭīkā (टीका).—[ṭīkyate gamyate granthārtho'nayā] A commentary, gloss; काव्यप्रकाशस्य कृता गृहे गृहे टीका तथाप्येष तथैव दुर्गमः (kāvyaprakāśasya kṛtā gṛhe gṛhe ṭīkā tathāpyeṣa tathaiva durgamaḥ).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṭīkā (टीका).—f.

(-kā) A commentary. E. ṭīk to go, affixes ghañ and ṭāp by which the sense of the text proceeds. ṭīkyate mamyate granthārthī'nayā ṭīka karaṇe ghañ ghañarthe ka vā .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṭīkā (टीका).—f. A commentary.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṭīkā (टीका).—[feminine] a commentary, [especially] on some other commentary.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ṭīkā (टीका):—[from ṭīk] f. a commentary ([especially] on another [commentator or commentary] e.g. Ānanda-giri’s ṭīkā on Śaṃkara’s bhāṣya).

2) Tika (तिक):—m. Name of a man [gana] 1. naḍādi, [Pāṇini 4-1, 154.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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