Tejastattva, Tejas-tattva: 2 definitions

Introduction:

Tejastattva means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Tejastattva in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Tejastattva (तेजस्तत्त्व, “fire”):—One of the Thirty-six Tattvas, according to Śaiva doctrine. It is also known as the agnitattva. This is the thirty-fourth or third tattva (when counting in reverse). These primary principles (tattva) represent the different manifestations of Brahman (universal consciousness) which together form the basis of our experiences. The Tejas-tattva forms part of the group of twenty-four Aśuddha-tattvas, which together constitue the realm of Aśuddha-māyā. It also forms part of the sub-group named Mahābhūta (‘great elements’).

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Tejastattva in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Tejastattva (तेजस्तत्त्व) or simply Tejas refers to the “fire principle”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(Kubjikā) is the colour of (dark) blue collyrium. [...] The lotus, which is the eight-fold creation, should be imagined on the ghost. The Earth principle is in (the Wheel) of the Self-supported. One should think that Water is in (her) navel and Fire [i.e., tejas] in the centre of the heart. One should imagine that Wind is in (her) throat and Space on (her) forehead. All (the elements) are located in these (places). Thousands of millions of Kulas are part of the Kula tradition. The teaching concerning (the goddess’s) body is hard to acquire even by the gods.”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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