Taramriga, Tārāmṛga, Tara-mriga: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Taramriga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Tārāmṛga can be transliterated into English as Taramrga or Taramriga, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Taramriga in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Tārāmṛga (तारामृग) refers to the “starry deer” (the lunar mansion known as Mṛgaśīrṣa consisting of three stars), and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 22.80. The poet speaks of the “starry deer” as being chased by Śiva with his arrows. There are at least two legends which explain the allusion. It is stated in Vāmanapurāṇa (chapter 5) that the sacrifice of Dakṣa when broken up by Śiva fled to the sky in the guise of a deer, and remained there with his limbs studded with stars.

There is another story in Skandpurāṇa (Brahmakhaṇḍa, 40.6-13 of Setumāhātmya), according to which Brahmā attempted to commit incest with his daughter Vāk, and when the latter ran away in the form of a hind, Brahmā pursued her in the form of a deer. Śiva saw trhis and shot the deer-shaped god with his arrows. A light emanating from the wounded body of the deer went up to the sky and became the Mṛgaśīrṣa constellation. Cf. Harṣacarita, chapter 3 (and Saṃketa commentary). Cf. also Haravijaya 30.92; 31.43.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

Discover the meaning of taramriga or taramrga in the context of Kavya from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Taramriga in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Tārāmṛga (तारामृग).—the constellation मृगशिरस् (mṛgaśiras)

Derivable forms: tārāmṛgaḥ (तारामृगः).

Tārāmṛga is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tārā and mṛga (मृग).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tārāmṛga (तारामृग).—m. the fifth lunar constellation, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 49, 45.

Tārāmṛga is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tārā and mṛga (मृग).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tārāmṛga (तारामृग).—[masculine] [Name] of a lunar mansion.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tārāmṛga (तारामृग):—[=tārā-mṛga] [from tārā > tāra] m. ‘star-antelope’, the Nakṣatra Mṛga-śīrṣa, [Mahābhārata iii, 16020; Rāmāyaṇa iii.]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Tārāmṛga (तारामृग):—(tārā + mṛga) m. die Stern-Antilope, das Nakṣatra Mṛgaśīrṣa: anvadhāvanmṛgaṃ rāmo rudrastārāmṛgaṃ yathā [Mahābhārata 3, 16020.] [Rāmāyaṇa 3, 49, 16. 45.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Tārāmṛga (तारामृग):—m. das Mondhaus Mṛgaśīrṣa.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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