Tanka, Ṭaṅka, Ṭanka, Taṅka: 18 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Tanka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

The small chisel used by the stone-mason is called the ṭaṅka.

Source: Red Zambala: Hindu Icons and Symbols | Inner Circle IV

A weapon which is unique to Murugan is the Ṭaṅka or chisel used by sculptors and stone-masons — śilpis. It represents the work that needs to be done on ourselves in order to manifest our true essence nature. – The figure is already present in the stone, but it takes the skill of the sculptor to liberate it. In the same way the Jīvātman is present within the body/mind casing, it takes the skill of a sādhaka to reveal it.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)

Ṭaṅka (टङ्क, “chisel”) refers to one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—The small chisel used by the stonemason is called the ṭaṅka.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Ṭaṅka (टङ्क) refers to a unit for measurement of weight, corresponding to one-tenth of a pala, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.14:—“twenty full lotuses (kamalā) constitute one prastha measure. A Thousand Bilva leaves (bilvapatra) constitute half a prastha. Petals of lotuses (śatapatra), a thousand in number constitute half a prastha. Ten ṭaṅka weight constitutes one pala and sixteen palas make one prastha. Flowers for worship shall be weighed in the balance according to this calculation. The worship thus duly performed shall accord all cherished desires. If the devotee worships with no specific desires he will become Śiva himself”.

Source: Shodhganga: Temples and cult of Sri Rama in Tamilnadu

Tanka (also Tuppul) refers to one of the 108 divyadesas according to Priyavaccan Pillai’s compendium of the Ramayana based on the Nalayirativviyappirapantam.—Tanka is the birth place of Desikacarya. The Lord is named but supposed to be of the form of “Light”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Acta Orientalia vol. 74 (2013): Historical sequence of the Vaiṣṇava Divyadeśas

Taṇkā (Tūppul-Kāñci) refers to one of the 108 Vaishnava Divya Desam (divyadeśas or divyasthalas), located in the topographical division of Toṇṭaināṭu (“Northern Tamil Nadu”), according to the 9th century Nālāyirativviyappirapantam (shortly Nālāyiram).—Tradition would record the Vaiṣṇava divyadeśas or divyasthalas are 108. The divyadeśa is a base of the cult of Viṣṇu in Viṣṇuism [Vaiṣṇavism] tradition. The list of 108 [viz., Taṇkā] seems to have reached maturation by about the early 9th century CE as all the deśas are extolled in the hymns of the twelve Āḻvārs.

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Ṭaṅka.—(EI 9, 20; CII 4; ML), name of a coin; cf. Vijayarāja- ṭaṅka, ṭaṅka issued by Vijayarāja; spelt often as ṭaṅkā and in old Bengali as taṅkā; same as śāna also called dharaṇa; a coin in general; regarded as equal to 4 silver fanams; name applied to both gold and silver issues 80 ratis in weight (JNSI, Vol. XXII, pp. 197-98); silver coins of the Delhi Sult8āns—96 or 100 ratis in weight. See JNSI, Vol. XVI, pp. 42-49. Cf. śāśukāni- ṭaṅka, hema-ṭaṅka, raupya-ṭṅka; also ṭaṅka (LP), a copper coin equal to half of a pice. (Chamba), a copper coin equal to (1/20) of a Rupee. Note: ṭaṅka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Ṭaṅka.—a coin in general; a silver coin (often one tola in weight); same as śāna; equal to 4 silver fanams, silver coin of the Delhi Suḻtāns, 96 or 100 ratis in weight; same as aṭha- gānī (q. v.); a small copper coin; (1/2) of a rupee. There were gold and copper taṅkas; see hema-ṭaṅka and raupya-ṭaṅka. Cf. ṭāṅk, etc. Note: ṭaṅka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

ṭanka : (m.) an instrument to cut stones.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ṭaṅka (टंक).—ad (ṭaṅka S A weight.) An emphatic particle used with nouns and verbs referring to measures and weights. Exactly to the degree or quantity of; up to the measure or amount of. Ex. hēṃ vajana āṇi tēṃ māpa ṭaṅka āhēta; puṇyācē māpānēṃ dāṇē āṇalē tē ṭaṅka utaralē i. e. Weight with weight; measure with measure.

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ṭaṅka (टंक).—m S A stone-cutter's chisel. 2 A weight equal to four māṣa &c. See under ṭāṅka Sig. I.

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ṭāṅka (टांक).—m (ṭaṅka S) A weight, according to some, of one tōḷā or the seventy-secondth part of a pakkā śēra; according to others, of nine māsē; according to others, of four māsē. 2 The nib of a pen. 3 By melon. A penful of ink. Pr. ṭāṅkā āgaḷēṃ li- hāvēṃ ghāṃsā uṇēṃ jēvāvēṃ Write a nibful over; eat a mouthful under (or less). Hence a very small quantity of a liquor gen. 4 A metal plate with an image of a god impressed. Hence fig. An indispensable person at a feast or rite--who must be invited. 5 (Poetry.) A rupee or any silver coin. 6 (Enhancing particle to kōraḍā) Utterly dried up--a river, tank, well. ṭāṅka guntaṇēṃ g. of s. To be bound by some note of hand passed or writing executed. ṭāṅka māraṇēṃ To set down in writing. ṭāṅkānēṃ (or lēkhaṇīcyā ṭāṅkānēṃ) gaḷā kāpaṇēṃ To kill with the pen.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ṭaṅka (टंक).—ad An emphatic particle used with nouns and verbs referring to mea- sures and weights. Exactly to the degree or quantity of; upto the measure or amount of Ex. puṇyācē māpānēṃ dāṇē āṇilē tē ṭaṅka utaralē.

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ṭaṅka (टंक).—m A stone–cutter's chisel.

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ṭāṅka (टांक).—m A weight. The nib of a pen. A penful of ink. (Enhancing particle to kōraḍā.) Utterly dried up-a river, 2tank, well. ṭāṅka gutaṇēṃ To be bound by some note of hand passed or writing executed. ṭāṅka māraṇēṃ To set down in writing. ṭāṅkāṇēṃ gaḷā kāpaṇēṃ To kill with the pen.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ṭaṅka (टङ्क).—[ṭaṅk-ghañ ac vā]

1) A hatchet, an axe; a stone-cutter's chisel; टङ्कैर्मनःशिलगुहेव विदार्यमाणा (ṭaṅkairmanaḥśilaguheva vidāryamāṇā) Mk.1.2; R.12.8; Ki.9.22.

2) A sword.

3) The sheath of a sword.

4) A peak shaped like the edge of a hatchet; the slope or declivity of a hill; शिलाः सटङ्कशिखराः (śilāḥ saṭaṅkaśikharāḥ) Bhāg.8.1.46;1.67.26; Rām.7.5.24. हिमाद्रिटङ्कादिव भान्ति यस्यां गङ्गाम्बुपातप्रतिमा गृहेभ्यः (himādriṭaṅkādiva bhānti yasyāṃ gaṅgāmbupātapratimā gṛhebhyaḥ) Bk.1. 8.

5) Anger.

6) Pride.

7) The leg.

8) A chasm, cleft.

9) The wood-apple tree.

1) Borax.

11) A weight of silver equal to four Māṣas; Śukra.4.179.

12) The fruit of the wood-apple (n.)

13) A stamped coin.

14) A spade, hoe.

15) Beauty, grace; L. D. B.

16) The ankle; टङ्कोऽस्त्री टङ्कणे गुल्फे काणान्तरखनित्रयोः । कोशेऽ- श्मदारणेऽपि स्याज्जङ्घायां मासि कथ्यते (ṭaṅko'strī ṭaṅkaṇe gulphe kāṇāntarakhanitrayoḥ | kośe'- śmadāraṇe'pi syājjaṅghāyāṃ māsi kathyate) || Nm.

17) (in music) A kind of measure.

-kā The leg.

Derivable forms: ṭaṅkaḥ (टङ्कः), ṭaṅkam (टङ्कम्).

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Ṭāṅka (टाङ्क).—A kind of spirituous liquor (prepared from the fruit of the wood-apple tree).

Derivable forms: ṭāṅkam (टाङ्कम्).

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Taṅka (तङ्क).—[taṅk bhāve ac]

1) Living in distress, a miserable life.

2) Grief produced by separation from a beloved object.

3) Fear, terror.

4) A stone-cutter's chisel.

5) A garment.

Derivable forms: taṅkaḥ (तङ्कः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṭaṅka (टङ्क).—mn.

(-ṅkaḥ-ṅkaṃ) 1. A kind of elephant or wood apple, nīlakapittha. 2. Borax. 3. A spade or hoe. m.

(-ṅkaḥ) 1. A hatchet or stone cutter’s chisel. 2. A sword, a scimiter, a sacrificial hatchet or knife. 3. A scabbard, a sword-sheath. 4. Anger, wrath. 5. A weight of (silver) equal to four mashas. 6. A coin. 7. Pride, arrogance. 8. A cleft, a chasm. 9. A peak. f.

(-ṅgā) 1. The leg. 2. The edge or side of a mountain. E. ṭaki to bind, affix ac ghañ vā or ṭa imitative, kai to emit sound, affix ḍa, and num augment. saṃjñāyām .

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Taṅka (तङ्क).—m.

(-ṅkaḥ) 1. An axe, a crow, a stone cutter’s chisel: see ṭaṅka. 2. Grief upon separation from a beloved object. 3. Fear, terror. 4. Wearing cloth. 5. Living in distress. E. taki to be in distress, &c. affix ac. bhāve

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṭaṅka (टङ्क).—I. m. and n. 1. A hatchet, [Harivaṃśa, (ed. Calc.)] 5009. 2. Slope, [Bhaṭṭikāvya, (ed. Calc.)] 1, 8 (Sch.). Ii. m. 1. A weight equal to 4 māṣas, [Lassen, Anthologia Sanskritica.] 29, 4. 2. (and n?) A coin, [Hitopadeśa] 98, 11.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṭaṅka (टङ्क).—[substantive] hoe, chisel, stamp.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ṭaṅka (टङ्क):—[from ṭaṅk] mn. ([cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) a spade, hoe, hatchet, stone-cutter’s chisel, [Harivaṃśa 5009ff.; Rāmāyaṇa ii, 80, 7; Mṛcchakaṭikā] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] a peak or crag shaped like the edge of a hatchet, edge or declivity of a hill, [Mahābhārata xii, 8291; Rāmāyaṇa vii, 5, 24; Bhāgavata-purāṇa viii, x; Bhaṭṭi-kāvya i, 8]

3) [v.s. ...] a leg, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] borax, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] pride, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] m. a sword, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] a scabbard, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] a weight of 4 Māṣas, [Śārṅgadhara-saṃhitā i, 19; Vetāla-pañcaviṃśatikā iv, 2/3]

9) [v.s. ...] a stamped coin, [Hitopadeśa]

10) [v.s. ...] Feronia elephantum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) [v.s. ...] wrath, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] (in music) a kind of measure

13) [v.s. ...] a man of a particular caste or tribe, [Rājataraṅgiṇī vii, 1003]

14) [v.s. ...] n. the fruit of Feronia elephantum, [Suśruta]

15) Ṭaṅkā (टङ्का):—[from ṭaṅka > ṭaṅk] f. a leg, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

16) [v.s. ...] (in music) Name of a Rāgiṇī.

17) Ṭāṅka (टाङ्क):—n. a spirituous liquor prepared from the ṭaṅka fruit, [Manu-smṛti xi, 96 [Scholiast or Commentator]; Religious Thought and Life in India p.193.]

18) Taṅka (तङ्क):—[from taṅk] mn. grief produced by separation from a beloved object, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc. [Scholiast or Commentator]]

19) [v.s. ...] fear, [ib.]

20) [v.s. ...] [varia lectio] for ṭaṅka (a chisel), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

21) [v.s. ...] cf. ā-, tapas-

22) [v.s. ...] pra-taṅkam.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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