Tandula, Taṇḍula: 17 definitions

Introduction

Tandula means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल):—Another name for Raktaśāli, which is possibly identified with Śāli (Oroxylum indicum), a species of medicinal plant and used in the treatment of fever (jvara). It is described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) which is part of the 7th-century Mādhavacikitsā, a Sanskrit classical work on Āyurveda.

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल) refers to “rice grains” and is mentioned in a list of potential causes for indigestion in the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—A complete section in Bhojanakutūhala is devoted for the description of agents that cause indigestion [viz., taṇḍula (rice grains)]. These agents consumed on a large scale can cause indigestion for certain people. The remedies [viz., kṣīravāri (milk with water)] for these types of indigestions are also explained therewith.

Taṇḍula (rice grains) is also mentioned as a remedy for indigestion caused by nārīkeraphala (coconut) or tālabīja (fan-palm).

Source: Ancient Science of Life: Botanical identification of plants described in Mādhava Cikitsā

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल) or Śāli refers to the medicinal plant Oryza sativa L., and is used in the treatment of atisāra (diarrhoea), according to the 7th century Mādhavacikitsā chapter 2. Atisāra refers to a condition where there are three or more loose or liquid stools (bowel movements) per day or more stool than normal.  The second chapter of the Mādhavacikitsā explains several preparations [including Taṇḍula] through 60 Sanskrit verses about treating this problem.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल) refers to the medicinal plant known as “Oryza sativa Linn.” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning taṇḍula] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

1) Taṇḍula (तण्डुल) refers to “rice grains” used when worshipping Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.11:—“[...] in the holy vessels full of water he shall pour water reciting various mantras after straining it with a white cloth duly. The sprinkling need not be performed until sandal paste is mixed. Then raw rice grains (taṇḍula) made beautiful (by adding turmeric powder etc.) shall be offered joyously to Śaṅkara”.

2) Taṇḍula (तण्डुल) refers to “rice grains”, which are used in the worship of Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.14:—“[...] now, O excellent one, listen to the quantity of and the benefit accruing from grains and pulses (dhānya) in their use for worship of Śiva. Heaping up rice grains (taṇḍula) by way of worship causes prosperity. Six and a half prastha, and two palas of rice grains constitute a hundred thousand in number of grains. These shall be used in their unsplit form for the worship of Śiva. [...] Worship of Rudra shall be performed at first and a fine cloth (susundara-vastra) shall be spread over the liṅga. The rice grains (taṇḍula) shall be put over the cloth at the time of worship. At the end of worship, a coconut fruit (śrīphala) shall be placed with scents and flowers (gandhapuṣpa) etc. and fumigated with incense (dhūpa). The devotee shall attain the benefit of worship”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Sacred Texts: The Grihya Sutras, Part 2 (SBE30)

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल) refers to “unhusked grains”, piṣṭa is the ground flour. In Sanskrit a distinction is made between śasya, the corn in the field, dhānya, corn with the husk, taṇḍula, grains without husks, anna, roasted grains.

Dharmashastra book cover
context information

Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल, ‘grain,’ especially ‘ rice grain,’) is mentioned very often in the Atharvaveda and later, but not in the Ṛgveda. This accords with the fact that rice cultivation seems hardly known in the Ṛgveda. Husked (karṇa) and unhusked (akarṇa) rice is referred to in the Taittirīya-saṃhitā.

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Buddhism

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल)—One of the field-crops mentioned in the Jātakas.

India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Taṇḍula.—unit of measurement; half of a dhānya-māṣa (JNSI, Vol. XVI, p. 48). Note: taṇḍula is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Taṇḍula.—(1/2) of a dhānya-māṣa. Note: taṇḍula is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (T) next»] — Tandula in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

taṇḍula : (nt.) rice-grain.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Taṇḍula, (*Sk. taṇḍula: dialectical) rice-grain, rice husked & ready for boiling; frequent combined with tila (q. v.) in mentioning of offerings, presentations, etc. : loṇaṃ telaṃ taṇḍulaṃ khādaniyaṃ sakaṭesu āropetvā Vin. I, 220, 238, 243, 249; talitaṇḍulâdayo J. III, 53; PvA. 105.—Vin. I, 244; A. I, 130; J. I, 255; III, 55, 425 (taṇḍulāni metri causa); VI, 365 (mūla° coarse r. , majjhima° medium r. , kaṇikā the finest grain); Sn. 295; Pug. 32; DhA. I, 395 (sāli-taṇḍula husked rice); DA. I, 93. Cp. ut°.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

taṇḍula (तंडुल).—m Rice cleaned from the husk.

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tandūla (तंदूल).—m S Rice cleaned from its husk.

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tāndūḷa (तांदूळ).—m (taṇḍula S) Rice cleaned from the husk: also cleaned grains of harīka, rāḷā, sāvā, kāṅga, varī, baraṭī &c. As the word is used gen. in pl, it, in this number, better signifies a grain of rice &c. 2 Rice parched and afterwards boiled. A dish for fast-days. 3 A common term for the golden beads (shaped like grains of rice) of a necklace of females.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

taṇḍula (तंडुल).—m Rice cleaned from the husk.

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tandula (तंदुल).—m Rice cleaned from its husk.

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tāndūḷa (तांदूळ).—m Rice cleaned from the husk.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल).—[taṇḍ ulac] Grain after threshing, unhusking and winnowing; (especially rice); शस्य, धान्य, तण्डुल (śasya, dhānya, taṇḍula) and अन्न (anna) are thus distinguished from one another --शस्यं क्षेत्रगतं प्रोक्तं सतुषं धान्यमुच्यते । निस्तुषस्तण्डुलः प्रोक्तः स्विन्नमन्नमुदा- हृतम् (śasyaṃ kṣetragataṃ proktaṃ satuṣaṃ dhānyamucyate | nistuṣastaṇḍulaḥ proktaḥ svinnamannamudā- hṛtam) ||).

Derivable forms: taṇḍulaḥ (तण्डुलः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल).—m.

(-laḥ) 1. Grain after threshing and winnowing, especially rice. 2. A vermifuge plant: see viḍaṅga. 3. A potherb, a sort of Amaranth, (A. polygonoides.) E. taḍ to beat, Unadi affix ulac, and num inserted.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल).—[taṇḍ + ula], m. Grain after threshing and winnowing, especially rice [Pañcatantra] 104, 20; [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 76, 24.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Taṇḍula (तण्डुल).—[masculine] grain, [especially] of rice (used also as a weight).

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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