Talavrintaka, Tālavṛntaka, Talavrimtaka: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Talavrintaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Tālavṛntaka can be transliterated into English as Talavrntaka or Talavrintaka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Arthashastra (politics and welfare)

[«previous next»] — Talavrintaka in Arthashastra glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Kakati Ganapatideva and his times (artha)

Tālavṛntaka (तालवृन्तक) refers to the “bearer of the fan” and represents an official title designating one of the seventy-two officers (niyoga) of the Bāhattaraniyogādhipati circle, according to the Inscriptional glossary of Andhra Pradesh (Śāsana-śabdakośāmu). The bāhattaraniyoga-adhipati is the highest executive officer of this circle (including a Tālavṛntaka). For example: During the reign of Gaṇapatideva, the area extending between Pānagal to Mārjavāḍi was entrusted to Gaṇḍapeṇḍāru Gangayasāhiṇi as Bāhattaraniyogādhipati. Later on, this office was entrusted to Kāyastha Jannigadeva.

Arthashastra book cover
context information

Arthashastra (अर्थशास्त्र, arthaśāstra) literature concerns itself with the teachings (shastra) of economic prosperity (artha) statecraft, politics and military tactics. The term arthashastra refers to both the name of these scientific teachings, as well as the name of a Sanskrit work included in such literature. This book was written (3rd century BCE) by by Kautilya, who flourished in the 4th century BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Talavrintaka in Jainism glossary
Source: Singhi Jain Series: Ratnaprabha-suri’s Kuvalayamala-katha

Tālavṛntaka (तालवृन्तक) or Tālavṛntakakanyā refers to one of the Eight auspicious Girls—(representing the eight celestial nymphs of Indra’s heaven) which are mentioned as holding various attributes, according to Uddyotanasūri in his 8th-century Kuvalayamālā (a Prakrit Campū, similar to Kāvya poetry).—Page 93.17-8: There is a list of Eight auspicious girls holding respectively sprouted water-jars, fan-palm, fly-whisk, parasol, mirror, mṛdaṅga, harp, drum and cloth and ornaments. These were regarded as eight celestial nymphs of Indra’s heaven and frequently referred in literature as aṣṭakanyā or sabhā-kanyā. [...] The list of eight auspicious girls also occurs in the Lalitavistara (VII, p. 71) where their names are: [e.g., Tālavṛntaka-kanyā] [...] These were also known as the eight women of Indra’s court (aṣṭau yoṣitaḥ or aṣṭau apsarasaḥ).

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Talavrintaka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tālavṛntaka (तालवृन्तक).—n.

(-kaṃ) A fan, a Pankha: see the preceding.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tālavṛntaka (तालवृन्तक):—[=tāla-vṛntaka] [from tāla] n. a fan, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tālavṛntaka (तालवृन्तक):—[tāla-vṛntaka] (kaṃ) 1. n. Idem.

[Sanskrit to German]

Talavrintaka in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Talavrintaka in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Tālavṛṃtaka (ತಾಲವೃಂತಕ):—[noun] = ತಾಲವೃಂತ [talavrimta].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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