Susira, aka: Shushira, Sushira, Suśirā, Suṣira, Śuṣira, Śuṣirā; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Susira means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Suśirā and Suṣira and Śuṣira and Śuṣirā can be transliterated into English as Susira or Sushira or Shushira, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana

[Susira in Purana glossaries]

Sushira stone has marks of long lines.

(Source): archive.org: The Garuda puranam
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[Susira in Shaivism glossaries]

Suśirā (सुशिरा):—Name of one of the six deities which together form the third of the six groups of the aṣṭāviṃśatikrama (one of the main components in the worship of Kubjikā). This group of six deities is also referred to as ‘the auspicious six’ (anugraha-ṣaṭka) and is located in the Ghaṭasthāna. Their names are referred to in the kubjikāmata-tantra but actually described in the Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

[Susira in Natyashastra glossaries]

Suṣira (सुषिर) refers to “hollow” musical instruments (ātodya), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 30. Accordingly, “the hollow (suṣira) musical instruments, as the wise should know them, are made of bamboo (vaṃśa). The rules regarding their notes (svara) and the grāma are the same as that of the vīṇā”. According to the Nāṭyaśāstra 6.10 and chapter 28, it is part of the four groups of musical instruments (vādya).

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[Susira in Jainism glossaries]

Suṣira (सुषिर) refers to one of the four types of contrived sound (prāyogika) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 5.24.—What is suṣira sound? The sound produced by wind musical instruments e.g. flute, the conch etc.

(Source): Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 5: The category of the non-living
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Susira in Pali glossaries]

susira : (nt.) a hollow. (adj.), perforated; having a hole.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Susira, (adj. -nt.) (Sk. śuṣira) perforated, full of holes, hollow J. I, 146; Sn. 199; J. I, 172, 442; DA. I, 261; Miln. 112; Vism. 194=DhsA. 199; KhA 172; asusira DhA. II, 148 (Bdhgh for eka-ghaṇa). (nt.) a hole; PvA. 62. (Page 720)

(Source): Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Susira in Sanskrit glossaries]

Śuṣira (शुषिर).—a. [śuṣ-kirac] Full of holes, perforated.

-raḥ 1 Fire.

2) A rat or mouse.

-ram 1 A hole.

2) The atmosphere.

3) A wind-instrument.

--- OR ---

Śuṣirā (शुषिरा).—

1) A river.

2) A sort of perfume.

--- OR ---

Suṣira (सुषिर).—a.

1) Full of holes, hollow, perforated; चेतनावान्नरो हन्याद्यस्य नासुषिरं शिरः (cetanāvānnaro hanyādyasya nāsuṣiraṃ śiraḥ) Mb.12.266.33.

2) Slow in articulation.

-ram 1 A hole, an aperture, a cavity; सुषिराणि प्रवक्रिरे (suṣirāṇi pravakrire) Śiva B.13.92.

2) Any windinstrument (flutes and similar instruments); अवापुरुच्चैः सुषिराणि राणिताम् (avāpuruccaiḥ suṣirāṇi rāṇitām) N.15.16.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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