Susira, Suśirā, Shushira, Suṣira, Śuṣira, Śuṣirā, Suśira, Sushira: 20 definitions

Introduction:

Susira means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Suśirā and Suṣira and Śuṣira and Śuṣirā and Suśira can be transliterated into English as Susira or Sushira or Shushira, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: The Garuda puranam

Sushira stone has marks of long lines.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Suśirā (सुशिरा):—Name of one of the six deities which together form the third of the six groups of the aṣṭāviṃśatikrama (one of the main components in the worship of Kubjikā). This group of six deities is also referred to as ‘the auspicious six’ (anugraha-ṣaṭka) and is located in the Ghaṭasthāna. Their names are referred to in the kubjikāmata-tantra but actually described in the Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Suṣira (सुषिर) refers to “hollow” musical instruments (ātodya), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 30. Accordingly, “the hollow (suṣira) musical instruments, as the wise should know them, are made of bamboo (vaṃśa). The rules regarding their notes (svara) and the grāma are the same as that of the vīṇā”. According to the Nāṭyaśāstra 6.10 and chapter 28, it is part of the four groups of musical instruments (vādya).

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Suṣira (सुषिर) refers to “flutes” (and similar instruments), and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 15.16.

Kavya book cover
context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Suṣira (सुषिर) refers to a “cavity”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “[...] Then (the triangular Liṅga), perceived by the Inner Self, enters the cavity (suṣira). He who is established in contemplation (samādhi) sees the surface of the Sky, which is in the form of the Point. (Then) penetration (āveśa), which is the arising of the bliss of consciousness, takes place. The experience of the proclamation (of the scripture—āśravaṇa-pratyaya) is that that is one's own nature”.

2) Suśira (सुशिर) [=Suṣira?] refers to “emptiness”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly ,“There is another divine aggregate of letters in this House, the City of the Moon of the triple goddess (bhagavatī). It is the Island of the Moon and, saluted with respect by the best of the gods, it is the House of (the goddess) who is called ‘Full’ (pūrṇanāmā). The goddess there is full (i.e. the full moon) and is well established on the path of the Transmission (krama). In the tradition (anvaya), she is (the goddess Kubjikā otherwise called) Kukārā. (She is the) energy (that operates) in each division and, within the beautiful Sky of Emptiness (su-suśira-gagana), she is free of the networks of the clouds (of ignorance)”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Gitashastra (science of music)

Source: Shodhganga: Elements of Art and Architecture in the Trtiyakhanda of the Visnudharmottarapurana (gita)

Suṣira (सुषिर, “hollow”) refers to “those instruments which are filled with holes (and is hollow from inside)” and represents one of the four kinds of Instrumental Music, produced by an instrument (ātodya), according to the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa, an ancient Sanskrit text which (being encyclopedic in nature) deals with a variety of cultural topics such as arts, architecture, music, grammar and astronomy.—The word suṣira means hollow. So it can be said that the instrument called suṣira is filled with holes and it is hollow from inside. The suṣira kind of instrument is also known as wind instrument. According to the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa, instruments like flute etc. fall under the group of suṣira kind of instrument.

In the Saṃgītaratnākara, different kinds of wind instruments are mentioned. These are

  1. vaṃśa,
  2. pāva,
  3. pāvikā,
  4. muralī,
  5. madhukara,
  6. kāhala,
  7. tuṇḍukinya,
  8. cukkā,
  9. śṛṅgamata and
  10. śaṅkha.
context information

Gitashastra (गीतशास्त्र, gītaśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science of Music (gita or samgita), which is traditionally divided in Vocal music, Instrumental music and Dance (under the jurisdiction of music). The different elements and technical terms are explained in a wide range of (often Sanskrit) literature.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 5: The category of the non-living

Suṣira (सुषिर) refers to one of the four types of contrived sound (prāyogika) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 5.24.—What is suṣira sound? The sound produced by wind musical instruments e.g. flute, the conch etc.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Shushira in India is the name of a plant defined with Onosma echioides in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Cerinthe echioides L..

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Prop. Brit. Bot. (1929)
· Nuov. Giorn. Bot. Ital. (1924)
· Species Plantarum (1753)
· Ber. Schweiz. Bot. Ges. (1975)
· Taxon (1978)
· Species Plantarum (1762)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Shushira, for example side effects, extract dosage, health benefits, diet and recipes, pregnancy safety, chemical composition, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

susira : (nt.) a hollow. (adj.), perforated; having a hole.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Susira, (adj. -nt.) (Sk. śuṣira) perforated, full of holes, hollow J. I, 146; Sn. 199; J. I, 172, 442; DA. I, 261; Miln. 112; Vism. 194=DhsA. 199; KhA 172; asusira DhA. II, 148 (Bdhgh for eka-ghaṇa). (nt.) a hole; PvA. 62. (Page 720)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śuṣira (शुषिर).—a. [śuṣ-kirac] Full of holes, perforated.

-raḥ 1 Fire.

2) A rat or mouse.

-ram 1 A hole.

2) The atmosphere.

3) A wind-instrument.

--- OR ---

Śuṣirā (शुषिरा).—

1) A river.

2) A sort of perfume.

--- OR ---

Suṣira (सुषिर).—a.

1) Full of holes, hollow, perforated; चेतनावान्नरो हन्याद्यस्य नासुषिरं शिरः (cetanāvānnaro hanyādyasya nāsuṣiraṃ śiraḥ) Mahābhārata (Bombay) 12.266.33.

2) Slow in articulation.

-ram 1 A hole, an aperture, a cavity; सुषिराणि प्रवक्रिरे (suṣirāṇi pravakrire) Śiva B.13.92.

2) Any windinstrument (flutes and similar instruments); अवापुरुच्चैः सुषिराणि राणिताम् (avāpuruccaiḥ suṣirāṇi rāṇitām) N.15.16.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śuṣira (शुषिर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā-raṃ) Perforated, bored, pierced, full of holes or spaces. n.

(-raṃ) 1. A hole, a vacuity, a chasm. 2. A wind-instrument. m.

(-raḥ) 1. Fire. 2. A rat. f.

(-rā) 1. A sort of perfume, commonly Nali. 2. A river in general. E. śuṣ to dry, Unadi aff. kirac .

--- OR ---

Suṣira (सुषिर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā-raṃ) 1. Perforated, pierced. 2. Having apertures or holes. n.

(-raṃ) 1. A hole, an opening. 2. A wind-instrument. f.

(-rā) Naluka, a perfume. m.

(-raḥ) Fire. E. sa substituted for śa: see śuṣira .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śuṣira (शुषिर).—[śuṣ + ira], I. adj. Perforated (cf. śuṣa). Ii. m. 1. Fire. 2. A rat. Iii. n. 1. A hole. 2. A wind instrument.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Suṣira (सुषिर).—[adjective] hollow; [neuter] hole, cavity.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śuṣira (शुषिर):—[from śuṣ] See suṣira.

2) Suṣira (सुषिर):—[=su-ṣira] [from su > su-ṣaṃsad] a See sub voce

3) [from suṣi] b mf(ā)n. ([probably] [from] su + sirā q.v., also written śuṣ) ‘having a good tube or channel’, perforated, pierced, hollow, [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

4) [v.s. ...] having spaces, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

5) [v.s. ...] slow in articulation (= vilambita) idem

6) [v.s. ...] m. ‘having a good flow of fluid or sap’, a reed, bamboo, cane, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] m. fire (also n.), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] m. a mouse, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) Suṣirā (सुषिरा):—[from suṣira > suṣi] f. a [particular] fragrant bark, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] a river, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) Suṣira (सुषिर):—[from suṣi] n. a hollow, hole, cavity, [Kāmandakīya-nītisāra; Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

12) [v.s. ...] a wind instrument, [Saṃgīta-sārasaṃgraha]

13) [v.s. ...] the air, atmosphere, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] cloves, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śuṣira (शुषिर):—[(raḥ-rī-raṃ) a.] Perforated. n. A hole; a wind instrument. m. Fire; a rat. 1. f. A perfume; a river.

2) Suṣira (सुषिर):—(raṃ) 1. n. A hole; wind instrument. m. Fire. 1. f. A perfume, Nali. a. Performated, pierced.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Śuṣira (शुषिर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Jhūsira, Susira.

[Sanskrit to German]

Susira in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Susira (सुसिर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Śuṣira.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Śuṣira (ಶುಷಿರ):—[adjective] having a hole or holes.

--- OR ---

Śuṣira (ಶುಷಿರ):—

1) [noun] a hole; a chasm.

2) [noun] any musical instrument that has a hole or holes (as flute, clarinet, etc.).

--- OR ---

Suṣira (ಸುಷಿರ):—[adjective] having a hole or holes (as wind instruments); perforated.

--- OR ---

Suṣira (ಸುಷಿರ):—

1) [noun] a hole.

2) [noun] any of several wind instruments (as flute).

--- OR ---

Susira (ಸುಸಿರ):—[noun] = ಸುಷಿರ [sushira]2.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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