Suryendu, Sūryendu, Surya-indu: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Suryendu means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Sūryendu (सूर्येन्दु) or Arkendu refers to the “sun and moon”, as mentioned in verse 5.6-8 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] Not shall one drink (water that is) turbid [viz., āvila] and covered with mud, tape-grass, grass, and leaves, unseen by sun, moon, and wind [viz., sūryendu-pavana-adṛṣṭa], rained upon, thick, heavy, [...]: (such water) one shall not drink”.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Sūryendu (सूर्येन्दु) refers to the “sun and moon”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] I uninterruptedly bow to Nityā who has a form worthy of worship. She has ascended the shining throne made of the sun, moon (sūryendu), and fire. She holds in her hands a hook, a snare, arrows, and a bow, and carries the crescent moon on her crest. She is pure and clean, and her eyes, adorned with the tips of the locks of hair, are very beautiful. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Sūryendu (सूर्येन्दु) refers to the “sun and moon”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “The rain clouds, wind, sun, moon, earth, ocean and Indra [com.meghavāyusūryendukṣitisamudrendrāḥ] —those, which are protected by the doctrine, are of service to the whole world. I think, that doctrine, whose progress is unimpeded, has arisen for the benefit of the world of living souls in the guise of world-protectors”.

Synonyms: Arkendu.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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