Suryavarta, Surya-avarta, Sūryāvarta, Sūryāvartā: 8 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Suryavarta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Suryavarta in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Sūryāvartā (सूर्यावर्ता).—Name of a river originating from the top of the mountain in the middle of Sūryadvīpa, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 84. Sūryadvīpa is the name of a celestial region (dvīpa) situated to the north of Kuruvarṣa.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Suryavarta in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Sūryāvarta (सूर्यावर्त) refers to “migraine” and is one of the various diseases mentioned in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning sūryāvarta] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Sūryāvarta (सूर्यावर्त) or Sūryāvartarasa is the name of an Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fifth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 4, Hikkā: hiccough and Śvāsa: asthma). These remedies are classified as Iatrochemistry and form part of the ancient Indian science known as Rasaśāstra (medical alchemy). However, since it is an ayurveda treatment it should be taken with caution and in accordance with rules laid down in the texts.

Accordingly, when using such recipes (e.g., sūryāvarta-rasa): “the minerals (uparasa), poisons (viṣa), and other drugs (except herbs), referred to as ingredients of medicines, are to be duly purified and incinerated, as the case may be, in accordance with the processes laid out in the texts.” (see introduction to Iatro chemical medicines)

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Suryavarta in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sūryāvarta (सूर्यावर्त).—

1) a kind of sun-flower.

2) a head-ache which increases or diminishes according to the course of the sun (Mar. ardhaśiśī).

Derivable forms: sūryāvartaḥ (सूर्यावर्तः).

Sūryāvarta is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sūrya and āvarta (आवर्त).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Sūryāvarta (सूर्यावर्त).—name of a samādhi: Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 424.8.

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Sūryāvartā (सूर्यावर्ता).—name of a lokadhātu in the north: Lalitavistara 292.7.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sūryāvarta (सूर्यावर्त).—m. 1. a plant, Cleome viscosa. 2. a sun-flower.

Sūryāvarta is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sūrya and āvarta (आवर्त).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Sūryāvarta (सूर्यावर्त):—[from sūrya > sūr] m. Name of two plants, [Suśruta; Śārṅgadhara-saṃhitā]

2) [v.s. ...] Scindapsus Officinalis, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] a kind of sunflower, Helianthus Indicus, [ib.]

4) [v.s. ...] Cleome Pentaphylla, [ib.]

5) [v.s. ...] Cleome Viscosa, [Horace H. Wilson]

6) [v.s. ...] head-ache which increases or diminishes according to the course of the sun, [Suśruta]

7) [v.s. ...] a kind of Samādhi, [Buddhist literature]

8) [v.s. ...] Name of a water-basin, [Śatruṃjaya-māhātmya]

9) Sūryāvartā (सूर्यावर्ता):—[from sūryāvarta > sūrya > sūr] f. Polanisia Icosandra, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Sūryāvarta (सूर्यावर्त):—(sūrya + ā)

1) m. a) Scindapsus officinalis [Ratnamālā 77.] = jāmātar [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 3, 3, 157.] = varāhakālin [Hārāvalī 94. -] [Suśruta 2, 376, 5. 380. 8.] [Śārṅgadhara SAṂH. 1, 7, 85. 2, 1, 16.] — b) eine best. Meditation Lot. de la [?b. l. 254.] — c) Nomen proprium eines runden Wasserbassins (kuṇḍa) [Śatruṃjayamāhātmya 2, 598. 600.] —

2) f. ā = ādityabhaktā [Rājanirghaṇṭa im Śabdakalpadruma]

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Sūryāvarta (सूर्यावर्त):—

1) d) ein Kopfschmerz, der mit dem Sonnenlauf zuund abnimmt, [CARAKA 10, 9.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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