Surasura, Sura-asura, Surāsurā: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Surasura means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Surasur.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Surasura in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Surāsura (सुरासुर) refers to the “gods and demons”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.41 (“Description of the Altar-Structure”).—Accordingly, as mount Himavat (Himācala) said to Nārada: “[...] Showing kindness to me you take your food and rest for a while. Then gladly accompany Maināka and others to Śiva’s presence. Accompanied by these mountains you request Śiva along with the gods, and the great sages, Śiva whose sproutlike feet are worshipped by gods and demons (surāsura). Bring them here”.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Surāsurā (सुरासुरा) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.60.33). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Surāsurā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Surāsura (सुरासुर):—Group of gods and demons who gathered for churning the sea to get ambrosia, in the quest of immortality .

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Surāsura (सुरासुर) refers to “gods or demons”, according to the Kālī teachings of Abhinava’s Jayadrathayāmala.—Accordingly, “That energy (called) Kuṇḍalinī resides in the Secret Wheel (in the genitals). O fair lady, that place which fulfils all desires should always be kept secret. Then (it is called) Guhyā (the Hidden One) and is always more secret than the secret. The nectar that comes out of this is hard to acquire by gods or demons [i.e., surāsura]. A thousand rebirths are destroyed in the Ocean of Kula of one who possesses it. [...] Amā, the energy of the (New) Moon is located in the Door of Brahmā. Pure water falls (from) there and, having fallen into the heart of Kuṇḍalī, the nectar which is the juice of Kuṇḍalī comes out of his body. By just eating this, (Yogis) become immortal and free of old age, wrinkles, white hair and all diseases.”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Surāsura (सुरासुर) refers to the “Gods and Asuras”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 21.9cd-14]—“[...] The Gods and Asuras (surāsura) view mantras are seen as powerful and invincible. [mantras] confer benefits [because they are] all-favoring, all-bestowing, all-pervading, and Śiva. Briefly, O Mahadeva, speak to my question. There is not anyone higher than yourself, O Lord of the World. Please tell all, O Great Śiva, if I please you, O Lord”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

surasura (सुरसुर) [or रां, rāṃ].—ad Imit. of the whizzing or hissing sound of gunpowder under explosion.

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surasura (सुरसुर).—f The tingling, or the pricking and creeping sensation of a limb or member asleep, formication. 2 The whizzing or hissing of rockets or powder on being discharged.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

surasura (सुरसुर).—f A whizzing or hissing sound, emitting such a sound.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Surāsura (सुरासुर).—[masculine] [plural] the gods and the Asuras.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Surāsura (सुरासुर):—[from sura > sur] m. [plural] or ([probably] n.) sg. gods and Asuras, [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Surasura (सुरसुर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Surasura.

[Sanskrit to German]

Surasura in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Surasura in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Surāsura (सुरासुर) [Also spelled surasur]:—(nm) the gods and demons; -[yuddha/saṃgrāma] mythological battle of the gods and demons.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Surasura (सुरसुर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Surasura.

2) Surasura (सुरसुर) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Surasurāya.

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Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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