Supratishtha, aka: Supratiṣṭhā, Supratiṣṭha, Su-pratishtha; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Supratishtha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Supratiṣṭhā and Supratiṣṭha can be transliterated into English as Supratistha or Supratishtha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Supratishtha in Natyashastra glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Supratiṣṭhā (सुप्रतिष्ठा) refers to a class of rhythm-type (chandas) containing five syllables in a pāda (‘foot’ or ‘quarter-verse’), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 15. There are twenty-six classes of chandas and out of them arise the various syllabic meters (vṛtta), composed of four pādas, defining the pattern of alternating light and heavy syllables.

Supratiṣṭhā is described in the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 32:—“when the two more (i.e. the 3rd and the 4th syllables) are short it (pratiṣṭhā) becomes supratiṣṭhā”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Supratishtha in Chandas glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Supratiṣṭhā (सुप्रतिष्ठा) is one of the twenty-six varieties of Sanskrit metres (chandas) mentioned in the Chandaśśāstra 1.15-19. There are 26 Vedic metres starting with 1 to 26 letters in each pāda. It is a common belief that the classical metres are developed from these 26 metres. Generally a metre has a specific name according to it’s number of syllables (akṣara). But sometimes the same stanza is called by the name of another metre from the point of view of the pādas.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

Supratishtha in Itihasa glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Supratiṣṭhā (सुप्रतिष्ठा) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.28). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Supratiṣṭhā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

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Supratiṣṭha (सुप्रतिष्ठ) is the father of Supārśva according to Digambara (according to Śvetāmbara he is named Pratiṣṭha), according to the Ācāradinakara (14th century work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri). Supārśva is the seventh of twenty-four Tīrthaṅkaras in Janism. A Tīrthaṅkara is an enlightened being who has conquered saṃsāra (cycle of birth and death), leaving behind him a path for others to follow.

The wife of Supratiṣṭha is Pṛthvī. It is an ancient Jain practice to worship the Tīrthaṅkara’s parents in various rites, such as the pratiṣṭhāvidhi.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Supratishtha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Supratiṣṭha (सुप्रतिष्ठ).—a.

1) standing well.

2) very celebrated, renowned, glorious, famous. (-ṣṭhā) 1 good position.

2) good reputation, fame, celebrity.

3) establishment, erection.

4) installation, consecration.

Supratiṣṭha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms su and pratiṣṭha (प्रतिष्ठ).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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