Sulocana, aka: Sulocanā, Su-locana; 9 Definition(s)

Introduction

Sulocana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Sulochana.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

[Sulocana in Natyashastra glossaries]

Sulocanā (सुलोचना) is the name of an Apsara created for the sake of a type of dramatic perfomance. Acording to the Nāṭyaśāstra 1.46-51, after Brahmā asked Bharata for materials necessary for the Graceful Style (kaiśikī: a type of performance, or prayoga), Bharata answered “This Style cannot be practised properly by men except with the help of women”. Therefore, Brahmā created with his mind several apsaras (celestial nymphs), such as Sulocanā, who were skillful in embellishing the drama.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana

[Sulocana in Purana glossaries]

Sulocanā (सुलोचना) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (eg., Sulocanā) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

(Source): Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

Sulocana (सुलोचन).—One of the hundred sons of Dhṛtarāṣṭra. Bhīmasena killed him in battle of Kurukṣetra. (Mahā-Bhārata, Bhīṣma Parva, Chapter 64, Verse 37).

(Source): archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Sulocanā (सुलोचना).—A mind-born mother.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 17.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

[Sulocana in Itihasa glossaries]

Sulocana (सुलोचन) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.108.4) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Sulocana) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

(Source): JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[Sulocana in Shaivism glossaries]

Sulocanā (सुलोचना) or Prabhutā is the name of one of the thirty-two Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantra, as well as one of the thirty-six Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Uḍḍāmareśvaratantra. In the yakṣiṇī-sādhana, the Yakṣiṇī is regarded as the guardian spirit who provides worldly benefits to the practitioner. The Yakṣiṇī (eg., Sulocanā) provides, inter alia, daily food, clothing and money, tells the future, and bestows a long life, but she seldom becomes a partner in sexual practices.

(Source): academia.edu: Yakṣiṇī-sādhana in the Kakṣapuṭa tantra
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Katha (narrative stories)

[Sulocana in Katha glossaries]

1) Sulocanā (सुलोचना) is the daughter of king Suṣeṇa and the Apsaras Rambhā, as mentioned in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 28. Accordingly, “in time she [Sulocanā] grew up to womanhood, and a young hermit, named Vatsa, the descendant of Kaśyapa, as he was roaming about at will, beheld her in a garden”.

The story of Sulocanā was narrated to king Kaliṅgadatta by a certain Brāhman in order to demonstrate that “daughters are better even than sons, and produce happiness in this world and the next”.

2) Sulocanā (सुलोचना), daughter of king Paurava, was captivated by love at the sight of Sūryaprabha, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 44. Accordingly, as Vajraprabha said to Naravāhanadatta: “... and wherever any princesses beheld him [Sūryaprabha] she was immediately bewildered by love and chose him for her husband. ... And the fourth was the daughter of King Paurava, sovereign of Lāvāṇaka, Sulocanā by name, with lovely eyes”.

3) Sulocanā (सुलोचना) is the name of powerful Yakṣīnī, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 49. Accordingly, as a certain Yakṣiṇī said to Ādityaśarman: “... yes, handsome man, there is. Vidyunmālā, Candralekhā and Sulocanā the third are the best among the Yakṣiṇīs, and among these Sulocanā”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Sulocanā, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[Sulocana in Mahayana glossaries]

Sulocana (सुलोचन) is the name of a Buddha under whom Śākyamuni (or Gautama, ‘the historical Buddha’) acquired merit along the first through nine bhūmis, according to the Mahāvastu. There are in total ten bhūmis representing the ten stages of the Bodhisattva’s path towards enlightenment.

Sulocana is but one among the 500 Buddhas enumerated in the Mahāvastu during a conversation between Mahākātyāyana and Mahākāśyapa, both principle disciples of Gautama Buddha. The Mahāvastu is an important text of the Lokottaravāda school of buddhism, dating from the 2nd century BCE.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Lokottaravāda
Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Sulocana in Sanskrit glossaries]

Sulocana (सुलोचन).—a. fine-eyed.

-naḥ a deer. (-) 1 a beautiful woman.

Sulocana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms su and locana (लोचन).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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