Sugupta, Suguptā: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Sugupta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Sugupta (सुगुप्त) refers to “one who is well-hidden”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(The Śāmbhava yogi) has the authority (to perform the rites), knows the scripture and has a consort. He practices secretly and is always a renouncer. (Being) a householder, he observes the Rule. Solitary, he has a wife and, well hidden [i.e., sugupta], he eats the sacrificial pap. One who has abandoned strife, (being) tranquil and austere, he attains (the liberated state of) the Skyfarer. He has obtained initiation and, consecrated, he desires success in mantra. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Sugupta (सुगुप्त) refers to a “great secret”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.4.—Accordingly, as Umā (Durgā/Satī) spoke to the Gods:—“[...] Just as you, Rudra too, desires my incarnation in the abode of Himavat. Hence I shall incarnate. That shall be the end of misery in the world. All of you return to your abodes. You shall be happy for a long time. After incarnating I shall give Menā full happiness. I shall become Śiva’s wife. But this desire is a great secret [i.e., sugupta] with me. Śiva’s divine sport is wonderful. It deludes even the wise. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Sugupta (सुगुप्त) refers to a “hidden (sanctuary)”, according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—Accordingly, “[Visualisation of Parameśvara]:—In a hidden sanctuary (suguptasugupte mandire), the mantra master should sit on a soft cushion and should visualise himself as having the body of Parameśvara, as if [he were transformed into] Kāmeśvara, having no beginning and no end, shining like millions of suns. [...] ”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Sugupta (सुगुप्त) refers to “well-controlled”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “One who is restrained continually accumulates good karma by the activity of the body through his body which is well-controlled (sugupta) [com.—which is controlled (guptena)] or by abandoning the body. The body of embodied souls attaches to bad karmas through actions which possess constant exertion and which kill living beings”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Suguptā (सुगुप्ता).—name of a yakṣinī: Sādhanamālā 562.4.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sugupta (सुगुप्त).—mfn.

(-ptaḥ-ptā-ptaṃ) Secret, well-hidden or kept secret. n. Adv.

(-ptaṃ) Secretly, privily. E. su, and gupta hidden.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sugupta (सुगुप्त).—[neuter] well hidden or concealed; [neuter] [adverb]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Sugupta (सुगुप्त):—[=su-gupta] [from su > su-ga] mfn. (su-) well guarded, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa; Rāmāyaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] well hidden or concealed, kept very secret, [Kāvya literature; Pañcatantra]

3) Suguptā (सुगुप्ता):—[=su-guptā] [from su-gupta > su > su-ga] f. Mucuna Pruritus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sugupta (सुगुप्त):—[su-gupta] (ptaḥ-ptā-ptaṃ) a. Secret.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Sugupta (सुगुप्त) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Sugutta.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sugupta in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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