Sudha, Sudhā: 26 definitions

Introduction:

Sudha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Images (photo gallery)

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Sudhā (सुधा) is a Sanskrit word referring to “milk-hedge”, a flowering plant from the Euphorbiaceae (spurge) family, and is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā. The official botanical name of the plant is Euphorbia neriifolia and is commonly known in English as “holy milk hedge” or “dog’s tongue”. The literal translation of Sudhā is “welfare, ease, comfort”. As a traditional medicine, it is used in various recipes such as an Alkaline ash for cautery.

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Sudha [ସୁଧା] in the Odia language is the name of a plant identified with Tinospora cordifolia from the Menispermaceae (Moonseed) family. For the possible medicinal usage of sudha, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Sudhā (सुधा) is another name for Śāliparṇī, a medicinal plant identified with Desmodium gangeticum (sal leaved desmodium), from the Fabaceae or “legume” family of flowering plants, according to verse 4.17-20 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Sudhā and Śāliparṇī, there are a total of twenty-nine Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)

Sudhā (सुधा) refers to a “special kind of mortar/plaster”, representing materials used for the making of images (Hindu icons), as defined in the texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—The materials listed in the Āgamas for the making of images are wood, stone, precious gems, metals, terracotta, laterite, earth, and a combination of two or three or more of the materials specified above. The materials recommended in the śilpaśāstra for the fashioning of images are unburnt clay, burnt clay as in brick or terracotta, sudhā (a special kind of mortar/plaster), composite earth, wood, stone, metal, ivory, dhātu (mineral), pigment, and precious stones.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Shilpashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: OpenEdition books: Architectural terms contained in Ajitāgama and Rauravāgama

Sudhā (सुधा) refers to ““stucco” §§ 2.8, 13, 16, 17, 28; 4.7; 5.3.”.—(For paragraphs cf. Les enseignements architecturaux de l'Ajitāgama et du Rauravāgama by Bruno Dagens)

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Vastushastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Sudhā (सुधा) refers to the “nectar”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.17 (“The dialogue between Indra and Kāmadeva”).—Accordingly, as Kāma said to Brahmā: “[...] O dear friend, I shall cause the downfall of that enemy of yours who is performing a severe penance to usurp your position. [...] I can undoubtedly make Brahmā and Viṣṇu go astray. Others are of no consideration. I shall make even Śiva fall. I have only five arrows that are soft and flowery. My bow is of three types. That too is flowery. The bowstring consists of bees. My support and strength is my beloved wife Ratī. Spring is my minister. O god, I am having five forces. The moon, the storehouse of nectar [i.e., sudhā-nidhi], is my friend. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Yoga (school of philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (yoga)

Sudhā (सुधा) refers to “nectar”, according to the Amṛtasiddhi, a 12th-century text belonging to the Haṭhayoga textual tradition.—Accordingly, “The moon is on the peak of Meru and has sixteen digits. Facing downwards, it rains dewy nectar (sudhātuṣārābhāṃ sudhāṃ) day and night”.

Yoga book cover
context information

Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Yoga from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Sudha (सुध) refers to the “nectar (waters)” (of true restraint), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “One who is restrained who is intent on stopping the influx of karma fearlessly drives away the discharge of the poison of non-restraint with the nectar waters of true restraint (satsaṃyama-sudhā-ambu). A bad birth is hard to be accomplished even in a dream for him whose judgment, which is extremely skilful at examination like a door-keeper, shines in the mind”.

Synonyms: Sudhā, Nirmala.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geography

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)

Sudhā (सुधा) is the name of a commentary (on Vṛttaratnākara of Kedārabhaṭṭa) ascribed to Cintāmaṇi Daivajña (17th century). This work was composed in 1634 C.E.; 4 years later of Prastāracintāmaṇi of the author. Like Prastāracintāmaṇi, Cintāmaṇi also praises Lord Gaṇeśa with various adjectives, in the invocatory verse of the work. He says: “For smooth completion of my work, I pray Lord Gaṇeśa, whose cheeks are red as the vermilion (sindūra), who stays in the heart of Pārvatī along with other Śaiva deities”.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

1) Sudha in India is the name of a plant defined with Desmodium gangeticum in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Hedysarum lanceolatum Schumach. (among others).

2) Sudha is also identified with Euphorbia neriifolia It has the synonym Tithymalus edulis (Lour.) H. Karst. (etc.).

3) Sudha is also identified with Euphorbia nivulia It has the synonym Euphorbia nivulia var. helicothele (Lem.) Boiss. (etc.).

4) Sudha is also identified with Euphorbia royleana It has the synonym Euphorbia pentagona Haw. (etc.).

5) Sudha is also identified with Opuntia stricta It has the synonym Cactus strictus Haw. (etc.).

6) Sudha is also identified with Terminalia chebula It has the synonym Myrobalanus chebula Gaertn. (etc.).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Cell and Chromosome Research (1984)
· Taxon (1981)
· Resultati Scientifici della missione Stefanini-Paoli nella Somalia Italiana (1916)
· Illustrations of the Botany of the Himalayan Mountains (1836)
· Repert. Bot. Syst. (Walpers) (1842)
· Journal of Cytology and Genetics (1990)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Sudha, for example extract dosage, chemical composition, pregnancy safety, side effects, health benefits, diet and recipes, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Biology from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sudhā : (f.) the embrosia; lime; chunnam.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Sudhā, (f.) (cp. Sk. sudhā) 1. the food of the gods, ambrosia J. V, 396; Vism. 258=KhA 56 (sakkhara°).—2. lime, plaster, whitewash, cement Vin. II, 154; °-kamma whitewashing, coating of cement J. VI, 432; Mhvs 38, 74. (Page 719)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

sudhā (सुधा).—f (S) The beverage of immortality and sustenance of the gods, nectar. 2 The nectar or honey of flowers. 3 Mortar, plaster, chunam. 4 (In Sanskrit.) Juice; water; lightning; the milkbush; yellow myrobalan &c.

--- OR ---

sudhā (सुधा).—a (śuddha S) Right, correct, proper, becoming, fit. Ex. sudhā bōlarē nāṛyā bōḍakyā jhālyā sāṛyā.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

sudhā (सुधा).—f Nectar. Mortar. Juice. a Right, proper.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sudhā (सुधा).—[suṣṭhu dhīyate, pīyate dhe-dhā vā ka Tv.]

1) The beverage of the gods, nectar, ambrosia; निपीय यस्य क्षितिरक्षणः कथां तथाद्रियन्ते न बुधाः सुधामपि (nipīya yasya kṣitirakṣaṇaḥ kathāṃ tathādriyante na budhāḥ sudhāmapi) N.1.1.

2) The nectar or honey of flowers.

3) Juice.

4) Water.

5) Name of the Ganges.

6) White-wash, plaster, mortar; कैलासगिरिणेव सुधासितेन प्राकारेण परिगता (kailāsagiriṇeva sudhāsitena prākāreṇa parigatā) K.; कालान्तरश्यामसुधेषु नक्तम् (kālāntaraśyāmasudheṣu naktam) R.16. 18.

7) A brick.

8) Lightning.

9) The milk-hedge plant.

1) Emblic myrobalan.

11) Yellow myrobalan.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sudhā (सुधा).—f.

(-dhā) 1. Nectar, the beverage of immortality and sustenance of the gods. 2. The nectar or honey of flowers. 3. Juice. 4. Plaster, mortar. 5. A brick. 6. The Ganges. 7. Water. 8. Lightning. 9. The milk-hedge plant, (Euphorbia antiquorum, &c.) 10. A plant, (Aletris Hyacinthoides.) 11. Emblic myrobalan. 12. Yellow myrobalan. E. su pleasure, dhe to drink, or dhā the have, to support, (life,) aṅ and ṭāp affs.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sudhā (सुधा).—[su-dhā], and -dhe + a, f. 1. Plaster, mortar, [Rāmāyaṇa] 2, 80, 13; [Daśakumāracarita] in Chr. 199, 18. 2. A brick, Chr. 57, 22. 3. The beverage of the gods, nectar, [Pañcatantra] v. [distich] 42. 4. The nectar of flowers. 5. Juice. 6. Water. 7. Lightning. 8. The name of several plants.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sudhā (सुधा).—1. [feminine] welfare, comfort.

--- OR ---

Sudhā (सुधा).—2. [feminine] nectar or milk (lit. good drink); chalk, rough-cast.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Sudhā (सुधा) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—See Nyāyasudhā, Vākyasudhā, Sāhityasudhā.

2) Sudhā (सुधा):—Vṛttaratnākaraṭīkā by Cintāmaṇi.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Sudhā (सुधा):—[=su-dhā] [from su > su-tanaya] 1. su-dhā f. (√1. dhā; for 2. su-dhā etc. See sub voce) welfare, ease, comfort, [Atharva-veda; Aitareya-brāhmaṇa]

2) [=su-dhā] 2. su-dhā f. ([from] 5. su-√dhe; for 1. su-dhā, ‘welfare’ See [column]2) ‘good drink’, the beverage of the gods, nectar (cf. 2. dhātu, p.514), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] the nectar or honey of flowers, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] juice, water, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] milk (also [plural]), [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Pañcarātra]

6) [v.s. ...] white wash, plaster, mortar, cement, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

7) [v.s. ...] a brick, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] lightning, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] the earth, [Demetrius Galanos’s Lexiko: sanskritikes, anglikes, hellenikes]

10) [v.s. ...] Euphorbia Antiquorum or another species, [Caraka]

11) [v.s. ...] Sanseviera Roxburghiana, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] Glycine Debilis, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] Emblica or yellow Myrobalan, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] a kind of metre, [Kedāra’s Vṛtti-ratnākara]

15) [v.s. ...] Name of the, wife of a Rudra, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

16) [v.s. ...] of the Ganges, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) [v.s. ...] Name of various works.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sudhā (सुधा):—(dhā) 1. f. Juice, water; nectar, ambrosia; nectar of flowers; plaster, brick; the Ganges; myrobalan; name of several plants.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Sudhā (सुधा) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Chuhā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sudha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Sudha (सुध) [Also spelled sudh]:—(nf) memory; consciousness, senses; -[budha] memory; consciousness, senses; •[khonā/0na rahanā] see —[na rahanā; -dilānā] to remind; —[na rahanā] to forget; to lose or be out of senses; —[bisaranā] to forget; to lose or be out of senses; —[lenā] to remember; to enquire after.

2) Sudhā (सुधा):—(nf) nectar; ~[kara/dhara/nidhi] the moon; ~[rasa] nectar; ~[vṛpṭi] rain of nectar—plenty and prosperity.

context information

...

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Suḍha (सुढ) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Smṛ.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Prakrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Sudha (ಸುಧ):—[adverb] = ಸುದಾ [suda].

--- OR ---

Sudhā (ಸುಧಾ):—[adverb] = ಸುದಾ [suda].

--- OR ---

Sudhā (ಸುಧಾ):—[noun] = ಸುಧೆ [sudhe].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of sudha in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Related products

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: