Sucira, Sucirā, Sucīrā: 9 definitions

Introduction:

Sucira means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Suchira.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

Sucirā (सुचिरा) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (e.g., Sucirā) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Sucira (सुचिर) refers to a “(very) long time”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.22 (“Description of Pārvatī’s penance”).—Accordingly, after Pārvatī thought to herself: “Pondering frequently like this incessantly, she performed penance for a long time [i.e., sucira], with her face turned downwards, her apparel of bark and mind without any aberrations. She performed penance difficult to be performed even by the sages, so much so that people were struck with surprise. All of them came there to witness her penance. Considering themselves blessed, they proclaimed thus approvingly:—[...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Sucirā (सुचिरा).—A Mother Goddess.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 29.

2) Sucīrā (सुचीरा).—(Sucārā B)—a daughter of Śvaphalka.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 24. 17.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Sucira (सुचिर) refers to a “very long time”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Certainly, for embodied souls whose selves are blinded by the irresistible spreading of ignorance and passion, pains are to be endured for a very long time (sucira) in hell, etc.”.

Synonyms: Cirakāla.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sucira (सुचिर).—[adjective] very long (time); °— & [neuter] [adverb]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Sucira (सुचिर):—[=su-cira] [from su > su-cakra] mfn. very long ([in the beginning of a compound], am, āya, and ena, ‘for a very long time, a good while’; at, ‘after a very long time’), [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

2) Sucīrā (सुचीरा):—[=su-cīrā] [from su > su-cakra] See -cārā.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Sucira (सुचिर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Suira, Sucira.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sucira in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Sucira (सुचिर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Sucira.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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