Stuyamana, Stūyamāna, Stuya-mana: 6 definitions

Introduction:

Stuyamana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Stuyamana in Kavya glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Stūyamāna (स्तूयमान) refers to “being praised (on all sides)”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 225-226).—Accordingly, while describing the shire of the Goddess Caṇḍikā, “[Then follows the image of the Goddess Caṇḍikā, which matches the conception of Kālarātri in the passage from the Mahābhārata:] [...] she bore the coquettish apparel of a woman going out to meet Mahākāla at night, with a vine-like body furnished with a raiment reddened with saffron-dye, with a face with red eyes, whose brows were furrowed into a frown, whose lip was crimsoned with betel that was blood, whose cheeks were reddened by the light shed from ear-ornaments of pomegranate flowers, with a forehead on which there was a tilaka dot of vermillion made by a Śabara beauty, covered by a magnificent gold turban. She was worshipped (ārādhyamāna) by goats... mice... antelope and black serpents... She was praised (stūyamāna) on all sides by flocks of old crows; [...]”.

Kavya book cover
context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Stuyamana in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Stūyamāna (स्तूयमान) refers to the “praising” (of Devas, Siddhas, and Gandharvas), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 13.25cd-28, while describing the appearance and worship of Viśvakarman]—“Furthermore, [I shall describe] Viśvakarman, the Lord of the world. [...] [The Mantrin] must honor [him] by praising (stūyamāna) Devas, Siddhas, and Gandharvas. [The mantrin can choose to] worship [him] in a heap of [ritual] fire, or in water, or at mountains. In whatever place he thinks [of Viśvakarman], [the deity] grants the fruits of desire”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Stuyamana in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Stūyamāna (स्तूयमान) refers to “being eulogised”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.4.5 (“Kārttikeya is crowned”).—Accordingly, after the Kṛttikās spoke to Kārttikeya: “[...] Kumāra reached the foot of a Nyagrodha tree at Kailāsa in the fast chariot along with Nandin seated to his right. [...] Vīrabhadra and other Gaṇas followed them with different chiming cymbols beating the time and sporting about. Eulogising and being eulogised (stūyamāna) they sang songs of praise. Shouting cries of ‘Victory’ and ‘Obeisance’ the delighted people went to see the excellent son of Śiva born in the grove of Śara plants. [...]”

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Stuyamana in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Stūyamāna (स्तूयमान) refers to “being praised” (by the Brahmins), according to the according to the Kularatnoddyota, one of the earliest Kubjikā Tantras.—Accordingly, after Vṛkṣanātha took food with those belonging to the Cāṇḍāla caste: “[...] Then (having said that), praised by all the hosts of demons and gods, he entered the fire (prepared to test him). When he emerged out of the mouth of the fire all the Brahmins residing in the city praised him (stūyamāna). O goddess, once he had acquired fame in the Wheel of the Void and quickly and with force made one hundred thousand Brahmins (his disciples) in this way, the leaders of the towns made a sound (of approval) (?). [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Stuyamana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Stūyamāna (स्तूयमान).—mfn.

(-naḥ-nā-naṃ) Being praised. E. ṣṭu to praise, pass. v., śānac aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Stūyamāna (स्तूयमान):—[(naḥ-nā-naṃ) p.] Praised.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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