Sthulaksha, aka: Sthūlākṣa, Sthūlākṣa; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Sthulaksha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Sthūlākṣa and Sthūlākṣa can be transliterated into English as Sthulaksa or Sthulaksha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Sthulaksha in Natyashastra glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Sthūlākṣa (स्थूलाक्ष) is the name of a sage who was in the company of Bharata when he recited the Nāṭyaveda them, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 35. Accordingly, they asked the following questions, “O the best Brahmin (lit. the bull of the twice-born), tell us about the character of the god who appears in the Preliminaries (pūrvaraṅga). Why is the sound [of musical instruments] applied there? What purpose does it serve when applied? What god is pleased with this, and what does he do on being pleased? Why does the Director being himself clean, perform ablution again on the stage? How, O sir, the drama has come (lit. dropped) down to the earth from heaven? Why have your descendants come to be known as Śūdras?”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Sthulaksha in Purana glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

1) Sthūlākṣa (स्थूलाक्ष).—A giant. He was one of those giants who fought with Śrī Rāma while Rāma and Lakṣmaṇa were living in the forest in Pañcavaṭī. It is mentioned in Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa, Araṇya Kāṇḍa, Sarga 26, that when Khara, Dūṣaṇa and Triśiras were killed, Mahākapāla, Sthūlākṣa and Pramāthī confronted Śrī Rāma and were killed.

2) Sthūlākṣa (स्थूलाक्ष).—A Saintly hermit. He was one of those hermits who had visited Bhīṣma in his bed of arrows. (Mahābhārata Anuśāsana Parva, Chapter 26, Verse 7).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

.—similar to a-harītaka-śāka-puṣpa-grahaṇa and a-dugdha-dadhi- grahaṇa, etc. See Ep. Ind., Vol. XXXI, p. 5. Note: is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

See also (synonyms): A-harīta-parṇa-śāka-puṣpa-phala-dugdha-dadhi-ghṛta-takra-grahaṇa.

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.—refers to the right of the donee to treasure-troves, occasional finds or accumulations on the ground, elephants’ tusks, tiger's skin and certain prized animals without surrendering them to the king as ordinary tenants had to do; epithet of the gift village. Cf. Ind. Ep., p. 402. Note: is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

See also (synonyms): Nidhy-upanidhi-hastidanta-vyāghracarma-nānāvanacara-sameta.

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.—‘together with the madhūka and mango trees, forests, gardens, bushes (or, branches), grass yūti (grass land) and including the pasture land’; cf. Ind. Ep., p. 396. It is better to take sa-madhūka- cūṭa-vana-vāṭikā-viṭapa and tṛnayūti-gocara-paryanta separately. Note: is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

See also (synonyms): Sa-madhūka-cūta-vana-vāṭikā-viṭapa-tṛna-yūti-gocara-paryanta.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sthulaksha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

() or Culla-pantha or Cūḍapanthaka.—q.v.; so read in Sukh 2.11 for Culla-patka, a monstrous form for which, amazingly, there is no ms. authority, whereas one ms. (reading -patthena) obviously intends -panthena (instr.) as the note points out (two mss. omit the word; the fourth -pacchena, surely for -patthena = panthena).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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