Srat, Shrat, Śrat: 8 definitions

Introduction:

Srat means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śrat can be transliterated into English as Srat or Shrat, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Srat (स्रत्).—A short term used for the affixes शतृ (śatṛ) (अत् (at)) and शानच् (śānac) (आन (āna)) which are applied to roots to form the present and the future participles; cf. तौ सत् (tau sat) P III. 2. 127; cf also लृटः सद्वा (lṛṭaḥ sadvā) P III. 3. 14.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Śrat (श्रत्) [=Śrad?] refers to “faith”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.14 (“The Birth of Tāraka and Vajrāṅga”).—Accordingly, as Nārada said to Brahmā: “[...] How did Śivā perform the severe penance for the sake of happiness? How did the primordial energy who is greater than the universe secure Śiva as her husband? O great scholar, narrate all these complete in every detail to me, your son, who has dedicated his soul to Śiva and who has developed full faith [i.e., śrad-dadhāna] in Him”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śrat (श्रत्).—ind. A perfix used with the root धा (dhā); see श्रद्धा (śraddhā).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śrat (श्रत्).—Ind. A particle and prefix implying belief or reverence. E. śro-ḍati .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śrat (श्रत्).—perhaps properly śrath, a prefix combined and compounded with dhā, and in the Vedas with kṛ, and their derivatives, and implying faith.

— Cf. [Latin] cred in credo, for cred-do; see dhā, p. 437.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śrat (श्रत्):—or śrad ind. ([according to] to [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska iii, 10] = satya, ‘truth, faithfulness’; [probably] allied to [Latin] credo for cred-do; cor, cord-is; [Greek] καρδία, κραδίη, [English] ‘heart’; only in [compound] with √kṛ and dāna and √dhā and its derivations See below).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śrat (श्रत्):—adv. Particle implying belief or reverence.

[Sanskrit to German]

Srat in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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