Sopara, aka: Sopārā, Sopāra; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Sopara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Sopāra (सोपार):—Sanskrit name for one of the twenty-four sacred sites of the Sūryamaṇḍala, the first maṇḍala of the Khecarīcakra, according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. The Khecarīcakra is the fifth and final cakra located just above the head. Each one of these holy sites (pītha) is presided over by a particular Khecarī (‘sky-goddess’). This Sopāra-pītha is connected with the goddess Agnivaktrā (also known as Agnivadanā or Vahnyānanā or Agnijvālā or Agnijihvā).

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Sopāra (सोपार) refers to one of the twenty-four sacred districts mentioned in the Kubjikāmatatantra (chapter 22). Prayāga is presided over by the Goddess (Devī) named Agnivaktrā accompanied by the Field-protector (Kṣetrapāla) named Piśitāśa. Their weapon possibly corresponds to the kaṭṭārikā. A similar system appears in the 9th century Vajraḍākatantra (chapter 18).

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II) (shaivism)
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Sopāra (सोपार) refers to one of the twenty-four sacred districts mentioned in the 9th century Vajraḍākatantra (chapter 18). These districts are not divided into subgroups, nor are explained their internal locations. They [viz., Sopāra] are external holy places, where the Tantric meting is held with native women who are identified as a native goddess. A similar system appears in the tradition of Hindu Tantrims, i.e., in the Kubjikāmatatantra (chapter 22), which belongs to the Śākta sect or Śaivism.

Sopāra is presided over by the Goddess (Devī) named Piśitāsanā or Agnivaktrā accompanied by an unmentioned Field-protector (Kṣetrapāla). Their weapon possibly corresponds to the kaṭṭārikā and their abode (residence) is mentioned as being a śālmali-tree.

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II)
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geogprahy

Suparak-Sopara is one of the places visited by Chaitanya during his pilgrimage in Southern India between April 1510 and January 1512.—Suparak-Sopara—(in the Thana district), 26 miles north of Bombay. It was the capital of the Konkan from very ancient times to 1,300 A.D. (Bombay Gaz. xiv. 314-342).

Source: archive.org: Chaitanya’s life and teachings (history)

At Sopārā (ancient Śūrpāraka) a Buddhist Stūpa was opened in 1882. It yielded important relics including what appeared to be the fragments of the Buddha’s begging bowl. On another mound representing a Buddhist Stūpa, a Śiva temple has since been erected, but it too is now in a dilapidated condition. Cousens thought that it was left unfinished as the sculptures in- tended for its decoration are found scattered all round. One of these is an unfinished beautiful image of standing Brahmā.

Source: What is India: Inscriptions of the Śilāhāras
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

sōpārā (सोपारा).—a (sōpā) Easy, facile, nothard or difficult.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

sōpārā (सोपारा).—a Easy, not hard or difficult,facile.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 28 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Shurparaka
Surpāraka is the name of an ancient locality corresponding to Sopārā near Bassein, as mentioned...
Vijaya
Vijayā (विजया) is another name for Śivā: the Goddess-counterpart of Śiva who incarnated first a...
Brahma
Brahma (ब्रह्म) refers to the priest associated with all three Vedas, according to the Āpastamb...
Vasaka
Vaśakā (वशका).—f. (-kā) An obedient and docile wife. E. vaś subject, kan added.--- OR --- Vāsak...
Sthanaka
Sthānaka (स्थानक) refers to one of the nine maṇḍala (postures of the feet) which represents one...
Suppara
Suppāraka (सुप्पारक) is the name of a locality situated in Aparāntaka (western district) of anc...
Agnivaktra
Agnivaktrā (अग्निवक्त्रा) is the name of a Goddess (Devī) presiding over Airuḍī: one of the twe...
Nagapura
Nāgapura is the name of an ancient locality possibly corresponding to the modern Nāgaon, as men...
Suryamandala
Sūryamaṇḍala (सूर्यमण्डल) or Sūryyamaṇḍala.—n. (-laṃ) The orb or disc of the sun. E. sūrya and ...
Aparantaka
Aparāntaka (अपरान्तक).—f. °ikā, adj. of the western border, or of the country called Aparānta; ...
Pishitashana
Piśitāsanā (पिशितासना) or Agnivaktrā is the name of a Goddess (Devī) presiding over Sopāra: one...
Brahmagiri
Brahmagiri (ब्रह्मगिरि).—m. (-riḥ) A mountain. E. brahma and giri a hill; the hill of Brahma.
Hanjamana
Hañjamaṇa or Hañjamana.—(EI 25, 32), regarded by some as ‘a Parsee colony’, same as Persian anj...
Pishitasha
Piśitāśa (पिशिताश) is the name of a Kṣetrapāla (field-protector) and together with Agnivaktrā t...
Ranjali
Rānjalī is the name of a village mentioned in the “Rānjalī stone inscription of Haripāladeva”. ...

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