Somamandala, Somamaṇḍala, Soma-mandala: 1 definition

Introduction

Introduction:

Somamandala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Somamandala in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Somamaṇḍala (सोममण्डल):—One of the four maṇḍalas that make up the Khecarīcakra, according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. This maṇḍala consists of a ring of sixteen petals occupied by thirty-two female deities. These goddesses are said to be born from Kubjikā’s body and represent the thirty-two syllables of the Aghoramantra.

This is the list of the thirty-two goddesses associated with the sixteen petals of the Somamaṇḍala:

  1. Caṇḍā,
  2. Ghaṇṭā,
  3. Mahānāsā,
  4. Sumukhī,
  5. Durmukhī,
  6. Balā,
  7. Revatī,
  8. Prathamā,
  9. Ghorā,
  10. Saumyā,
  11. Bhīmā,
  12. Mahābalā (or Mahāmbikā),
  13. Jayā,
  14. Vijayā,
  15. Ajitā (or Jayantī),
  16. Aparājitā,
  17. Mahotkaṭā,
  18. Virūpākṣī,
  19. Śuṣkā,
  20. Ākāśamātarā,
  21. Sehārī (or Saṃhārī),
  22. Jātahārī,
  23. Daṃṣṭrālī,
  24. Śuṣkarevatī,
  25. Pipīlikā,
  26. Puṣpahārī,
  27. Aśanī (or Grasanī),
  28. Sasyahārikā,
  29. Bhadrakālī (or Rudrakālī),
  30. Subhadrā,
  31. Bhadrabhīmā (or Bhīmabhadrā)
  32. and Subhadrikā.

Each of the goddesses are plump and small, have large bellies and braod hips, and they can assume any form at will. They wear various ornaments such as a diadem and ear-rings. All of them have eight arms. In their left arms they hold a skull cup, a skull staff, a rosry and a spear. In their right arms they hold a trident, an iron club, a noose and a thunderbolt. Each deity is mounted on a different kind of animal.

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context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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