Somamandala, Somamaṇḍala, Soma-mandala: 4 definitions

Introduction:

Somamandala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Somamandala in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Somamaṇḍala (सोममण्डल):—One of the four maṇḍalas that make up the Khecarīcakra, according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. This maṇḍala consists of a ring of sixteen petals occupied by thirty-two female deities. These goddesses are said to be born from Kubjikā’s body and represent the thirty-two syllables of the Aghoramantra.

This is the list of the thirty-two goddesses associated with the sixteen petals of the Somamaṇḍala:

  1. Caṇḍā,
  2. Ghaṇṭā,
  3. Mahānāsā,
  4. Sumukhī,
  5. Durmukhī,
  6. Balā,
  7. Revatī,
  8. Prathamā,
  9. Ghorā,
  10. Saumyā,
  11. Bhīmā,
  12. Mahābalā (or Mahāmbikā),
  13. Jayā,
  14. Vijayā,
  15. Ajitā (or Jayantī),
  16. Aparājitā,
  17. Mahotkaṭā,
  18. Virūpākṣī,
  19. Śuṣkā,
  20. Ākāśamātarā,
  21. Sehārī (or Saṃhārī),
  22. Jātahārī,
  23. Daṃṣṭrālī,
  24. Śuṣkarevatī,
  25. Pipīlikā,
  26. Puṣpahārī,
  27. Aśanī (or Grasanī),
  28. Sasyahārikā,
  29. Bhadrakālī (or Rudrakālī),
  30. Subhadrā,
  31. Bhadrabhīmā (or Bhīmabhadrā)
  32. and Subhadrikā.

Each of the goddesses are plump and small, have large bellies and braod hips, and they can assume any form at will. They wear various ornaments such as a diadem and ear-rings. All of them have eight arms. In their left arms they hold a skull cup, a skull staff, a rosry and a spear. In their right arms they hold a trident, an iron club, a noose and a thunderbolt. Each deity is mounted on a different kind of animal.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Somamaṇḍala (सोममण्डल) refers to a “lunar disc”.—The moon also forms an important element of Pāśupata yogic practices. As we learn from the Skandapurāṇa (179.28ff.), as pointed out by Bakker (2015, 141), their “accomplishment in yoga” comes about through a process of withdrawing the senses until the practitioner can see a lunar disc (somamaṇḍala) in his heart. From the moonlight within his body, yogic powers, omniscience and the like arise. These powers include being immune to disease and possessing a divine body.

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Somamaṇḍala (सोममण्डल) is the name of a Maṇḍala, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 3.17-23, while describing a meditation on Amṛteśa in his form as Mṛtyujit]—“And so now, having constructed the amṛtāmudrā or the padmamudrā, [the Mantrin] should meditate on the Ātman. [...] One should think of him [dressed in] white clothes and ornaments, [draped in] a radiant garland of pearls, bulbs like moonlight, etc., his body is anointed with white sandalwood and dust-colored powdered camphor. In he middle of the somamaṇḍala, [he is] bathed in thick, abundant waves of amṛta [that make the] moon quiver. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of somamandala in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Somamandala in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Somamaṇḍala (सोममण्डल) refers to the “circle of moon”, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “(She is the principle called) the Doomsday Fire (vaḍava). Above the Trident, it is the triple principle and is located within power (kalā). The Doomsday Fire is the Wheel of Fire in the centre of (the reality) within the triangle. The Trident consists of the three energies (tejas) and is the Circle of Moon [i.e., somamaṇḍala], Sun, and Fire. The denote the principle of the Self, Vidyā, and Śiva. Power (kalā) is said to be Kuṇḍalinī. All of this is within that and its purity (śuci) is beyond doubt. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of somamandala in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

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