Smitamukha, aka: Smita-mukha; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Smitamukha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Smitamukha in Mahayana glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Smitamukha (स्मितमुख, “smiling face”).—Speaking with a smiling face (smitamukha) represents one of the qualities acquired by the Bodhisattvas accompanying the Buddha at Rājagṛha on the Gṛdhrakūṭaparvata, according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter X. Because they have uprooted hatred (dveṣa), chased away envy (īrṣyā), and always practice great loving-kindness (mahāmaitrī), great compassion (mahākaruṇā) and great joy (mahāmuditā), because they have avoided the four kinds of evil speech (mithyāvāda), they have acquired a pleasant face.

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of smitamukha in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Smitamukha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Smitamukha (स्मितमुख).—a. having a smiling face.

Smitamukha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms smita and mukha (मुख).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of smitamukha in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 545 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Sumukha
Sumukha (सुमुख).—mfn. (-khaḥ-khā or -khī-khaṃ) 1. Pleasing, agreeable. 2. Lovely, handsome-face...
Mukha
Mukha (“face”) refers to one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy c...
Durmukha
Durmukha (दुर्मुख).—mfn. (-khaḥ-khā-khī-khaṃ) 1. Scurrilous, foul-mouthed. 2. Hideous ugly. m. ...
Sucimukha
Sūcimukha (सूचिमुख).—n. (-khaṃ) The diamond. m. (-khaḥ) 1. A bird. 2. The white Kuśa grass. 3. ...
Gomukha
1) Gomukha (गोमुख).—A notorious King. He was born of the family of Krodhavaśā. (Śloka 63, Chapt...
Adhomukha
Adhomukha (अधोमुख).—mfn. (-kha-khā-khī-khaṃ) 1. Down-looked, looking downwards. 2. Inverted, tu...
Caturmukha
Caturmukha (Apabhraṃśa Caumuha=nominative Caumuhu), we see that he was one of the greatest Apab...
Shrimukha
Śrī-mukha.—(SII 12; SITI), royal order or charter; a letter from the king or a chief. Cf. Tamil...
Kalamukha
Kālamukha (कालमुख).—A hybrid race born from the union of men and Rākṣasas. Sahadeva defeated th...
Shanmukha
Ṣaṇmukha (or Sanmukhan) is the name of deity as found depicted in the Subramanya Swamy Temple (...
Smita
Smita (स्मित) refers to “blooming” (viz., of a flower), as mentioned in a list of twenty-six sy...
Kartarimukha
Kartarīmukha (कर्तरीमुख) or Kartarīmukhahasta refers to “scissors-like” and represents one of t...
Nandimukha
Nāndīmukha (नान्दीमुख).—m. (-khaḥ) 1. The lid or cover of a well. 2. The class of male progenit...
Antarmukha
Antarmukha (अन्तर्मुख).—adj. (pendant to Sanskrit bahirmukha), turned towards (loc.): antarmukh...
Agnimukha
Agnimukha (अग्निमुख).—n. of a nāga: Divy 119.26; 122.27.

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: