Sitasharkara, Sitaśarkarā, Sita-sharkara: 6 definitions

Introduction:

Sitasharkara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Sitaśarkarā can be transliterated into English as Sitasarkara or Sitasharkara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Sitasharkara in Ayurveda glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Sitaśarkarā (सितशर्करा) refers to “white sugar” and represents one of the varieties or products of Ikṣu (sugercane juice), according to the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—The properties and varieties of sugarcane are discussed in the ikṣu-prakaraṇa. The properties of sugarcane which is crushed with teeth and crushed in a huge machine are also explained in detail. Different products made out of sugarcane juice and their properties are also discussed. It include the properties of [viz., sitaśarkarā (white sugar)].

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Sitasharkara in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Sitaśarkarā (सितशर्करा) refers to “white sugar” (used for worship), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 10.39-45]—“[...] He worships with a mixture of white sandalwood, dust-colored powdered camphor, seeds, grain, and sesame, [mixed together] with white sugar (sitaśarkarā) [that has been] combined with ghee and milk. All meditation done with effort and volition is the highest, etc. [and] causes one to thrive, etc. If, while [performing the agreed mediation], worshiping with Mṛtyujit [in mind, the king] obtains great peace [mahāśanti] instantly”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sitasharkara in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sitaśarkarā (सितशर्करा).—candied sugar.

Sitaśarkarā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sita and śarkarā (शर्करा).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sitaśarkarā (सितशर्करा).—f.

(-rā) Candied sugar.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sitaśarkarā (सितशर्करा):—[=sita-śarkarā] [from sita] f. white ground sugar, lump-s°, [Sāhitya-darpaṇa; Pañcarātra]

[Sanskrit to German]

Sitasharkara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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