Sinivali, Sinīvālī, Sini-vali, Sinivālī, Shinivali: 14 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Sinivali means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Sinivali in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली).—Birth. A daughter of Aṅgiras. The wife of Aṅgiras was Smṛti. She gave birth to four daughters named Kuhū, Rākā, Anumati and Sinīvālī. (Viṣṇu Purāṇa, Aṃśa 1, Chapter 10).

(It is mentioned in Bhāgavata, Skandha 6, that Sinīvālī was the third daughter of Aṅgiras by his wife Śraddhā. Other details.

(i) Dṛśyādṛśyā is another name of Sinīvālī. Her body is small. So sometimes she can be seen and sometimes she cannot be seen. It is in this meaning that she gets the name Dṛśyādṛśyā (seen and unseen). Śiva bears her in his forehead. So she has another name Rudrasutā. (Mahābhārata Vana Parva, Chapter 218, Verse 5).

(ii) Śiva used Sinīvālī as the yoke of the horses of his chariot in the battle with Tripuras. (Mahābhārata Karṇa Parva, Chapter 34, Verse 32).

(iii) At the time of his birth Sinīvālī had come to see the child Subrahmaṇya. (Mahābhārata Śalya Parva, Chapter 45, Verse 13).

(iv) It is mentioned in Atharva Veda that Sinīvālī is a wife of Mahāviṣṇu. (See full article at Story of Sinīvālī from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

2) Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली).—A daughter born to Bṛhaspati by his wife Subhā. It is stated in Vāyu Purāṇa, Chapter 90, that though Sinīvālī was given in Marriage to Prajāpati Kardama, she abandoned him and lived with Soma (Moon).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली).—Left her consort Kardama and loved Soma with 8 other Devis; a devī attending on Soma.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 23. 34; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 65, 26; Vāyu-purāṇa 90. 25.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली).—Left her consort Kardama and loved Soma with 8 other Devis; a devī attending on Soma.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 23. 34; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 65, 26; Vāyu-purāṇa 90. 25.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.44.12) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Sinīvālī) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Sinivalī (सिनिवली) refers to one of the four daughters of Aṅgiras and Smṛti: one of the twenty-four daughters of Dakṣa and Prasūti, according to the Vaṃśa (‘genealogical description’) of the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, Ākūti was married to Ruci and Prasūti to Dakṣa. Dakṣa produced in Prasūti twenty-four daughters. [...] [Smṛti was given to Aṅgiras.] Smṛti and Aṅgiras had four daughters—Sinivalī, Kuhū, Rākā and Anumati.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Sacred Texts: The Grihya Sutras, Part 2 (SBE30)

Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली) refers to the “new moon which falls on the fourteenth day”.—Corresponding to these two kinds of Paurṇamāsī there are also two kinds of Amāvāsyā. That which falls on the fourteenth day is called Pūrvā-amāvāsyā, or Sinīvālī, the ἕνη καὶ νέα; that which falls on the pratipad, the first day of the new phase, is called Kuhū, Uttarā-amāvāsyā. Śvoyuktā. See also Ait.-Brāhm. II, 4; Nir. XI, 31-32.

Dharmashastra book cover
context information

Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

sinīvālī (सिनीवाली).—f S The day of full moon. sinīvālī- śānti An observance upon this day.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली).—The day preceding that of new moon, or that day on which the moon rises with a scarcely visible crescent; या पूर्वामावास्या सा सिनीवाली योत्तरा सा कुहूः (yā pūrvāmāvāsyā sā sinīvālī yottarā sā kuhūḥ) Ait. Br.; or सा दृष्टेन्दुः सिनीवाली सा नष्टेन्दुकला कुहूः (sā dṛṣṭenduḥ sinīvālī sā naṣṭendukalā kuhūḥ) Ak.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली).—f. (-lī) 1. The day preceding that of new-moon, or that on which the moon rises scarcely visible. 2. The goddess Uma. E. good fortune, ini aff., fem. form, sinī a digit of the moon, val to contain, aff. aṇ, fem. aff. ṅīp; several other etymologies occur.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली).—f. A name of the day of new moon, Journ. of the German Oriental Society, ix. lviii. 68.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली).—[feminine] [Name] of a goddess presiding over conception and childbirth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śinīvālī (शिनीवाली):—[wrong reading] for sin.

2) Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली):—f. (of doubtful derivation) Name of a goddess (in, [Ṛg-veda] described as broad-hipped, fair-armed, fair-fingered, presiding over fecundity and easy birth, and invoked with Sarasvatī, Rākā etc.; in [Atharva-veda] she is called the wife of Viṣṇu; in later Vedic texts she is the presiding deity of the first day of new moon, as Rākā of the actual day of full moon), the first day of new moon when it rises with a scarcely visible crescent, [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

3) Name of a daughter of Aṅgiras, [Mahābhārata]

4) of the wife of Dhātṛ and mother of Darśa, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

5) of Durgā, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) of a river, [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली):—[sinī-vālī] (lī) 3. f. The day before the new moon; Umā.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Sinīvālī (सिनीवाली):—f.

1) Name einer Göttin, welche fruchtbar macht und die Geburt erleichtert; die Genie des ersten Neumondstages und dieser Tag selbst [das 5, 5.] [Yāska’s Nirukta 11, 31.] [Amarakoṣa 1, 1, 3, 9.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 151.] [Medinīkoṣa l. 165.] [Halāyudha 1, 112.] [Ṛgveda 2, 32, 7. 8. 10, 184, 2.] [Atharvavedasaṃhitā 2, 26, 2. 6, 11, 3. 9, 4, 14. 14, 2, 15. 19, 31, 10.] [Vājasaneyisaṃhitā 11, 55. fg.] pra sinīvā.ī janayati [Taittirīyabrāhmaṇa 1, 7, 2, 1.] [Taittirīyasaṃhitā 3, 4, 9, 1. 6. 2, 4, 6, 2. 5, 5, 17, 1. 6, 18, 1.] [Aitareyabrāhmaṇa 3, 47.] yā pūrvāmāvāsyā sā sinīvālī yottarā sā kuhūḥ [7,11.] [The Śatapathabrāhmaṇa 9,5,1,38.] [Kāṭhaka-Recension 35,2.] [Śāṅkhāyana’s Śrautasūtrāṇi 1,15,3.] [Weber’s Indische Studien 1,39.] [WEBER, Jyotiṣa 59. 101.] [Mahābhārata 3,14451.8,1486.] [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka S. 48,57.] [WEBER, KṚṢṆAJ. 250.] [SAṂSK. K. 59,a,8.] [Viṣṇupurāṇa 2,8,80.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 4,12,48.8,16,26.] Tochter des Angiras [Mahābhārata 3, 14126.] [Viṣṇupurāṇa 1, 10, 8.] [Mārkāṇḍeyapurāṇa 52, 51.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 4, 1, 34.] Gattin Dhātar’s und Mutter Darśa’s [6, 18, 3.] unter den Namen der Durgā [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 1, 1, 51.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 50.] [Medinīkoṣa] [Harivaṃśa 9533.] sinīvālīkuhūśānti f. heisst eine Cerimonie zur Abwendung böser Folgen des Geborenseins an ihrem Tage [SAṂSK. K. 64,a.] —

2) Nomen proprium eines Flusses [Mārkāṇḍeyapurāṇa 57, 24.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 5, 20, 10.] — Das Wort wird fehlerhaft auch śi und sinībālī geschrieben; Versuche zur Deutung desselben s. [Weber’s Indische Studien 5, 230. fgg.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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