Simhaladvipa, Siṃhaladvīpa, Simhala-dvipa: 5 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Simhaladvipa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Simhaladvipa in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Siṃhaladvīpa (सिंहलद्वीप) or simply Siṃhala is the name of an island (dvīpa) according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 56. Accordingly, “... there he [Candrasvāmin] heard that the merchant Kanakavarman had gone from that island to an island named Karpūra. In the same way he visited in turn the islands of Karpūra, Suvarṇa and Siṃhala with merchants, hut he did not find the merchant whom he was in search of”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Siṃhaladvīpa, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

Discover the meaning of simhaladvipa in the context of Kavya from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Simhaladvipa in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Siṃhaladvīpa (सिंहलद्वीप) is the name of an ancient province, according to chapter 6.2 [aranātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly, as Sāgaradatta said to Kumbha:—“[...]. One day Vīrabhadra went in his wandering to the city Ratnapura, ruled over by King Ratnākara, in Siṃhaladvīpa. He sat down in the shop of Sheth Śaṅkha, who had a wealth of virtues fair as a conch, and was asked, ‘Where are you from, sir?’ Vīrabhadra replied, ‘I left my own home in Tāmralipti in anger and came here in the course of wandering, father.’ [...]”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of simhaladvipa in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Simhaladvipa in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

siṃhaladvīpa (सिंहलद्वीप).—n The island of Ceylon.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of simhaladvipa in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Simhaladvipa in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Siṃhaladvīpa (सिंहलद्वीप):—[=siṃhala-dvīpa] [from siṃhala > siṃha] m. the isl° of C°, [Buddhist literature; Kathāsaritsāgara etc.]

[Sanskrit to German]

Simhaladvipa in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of simhaladvipa in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: