Silk; 1 Definition(s)

Introduction

Silk means something in the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

Silk refers to a textile that was actively produced and exported in ancient India.—By the time trade with the Roman Empire reached its peak, India was a major exporter of textiles (eg., Silk), specially cotton and silk. The Vedas refer to various types of garments as well as fabrics such as wool (avi, śāmulya) or silk (tarpya), also to weaving and looms. India exported cotton to China, silk to Indonesia and all the way to the Far East.

Fabrics — especially cotton and silk — often provided supports for much painted, printed or embroidered artwork (see an example left, from Gujarat), whether the resulting piece was to be worn as a sari or brocade or hung as tapestry.

Source: Knowledge Traditions & Practices of India: Other Technologies: A Survey
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of silk in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 281 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Shalmali
Śalmali (शल्मलि).—mf. (-liḥ-lī) The silk-cotton tree: see śālmali .--- OR --- Śālmali (शाल्मलि)...
Patta
Paṭṭa (पट्ट).—(once in Sanskrit, pw, and not found elsewhere; error for Sanskrit paṭṭana ?), ci...
Dukula
Dukūla (दुकूल).—n. (-laṃ) 1. Wove silk. 2. Yery fine cloth or raiment. E. du for dur ill, kūl t...
Phala
Phala (फल) refers to “offering fruit”, representing one of the various services (upacāra) of a ...
Purana
Purāṇa (पुराण).—The purāṇas were first compiled by Brahmā (Vāyu-purāṇa I.60-61). Sanatkumāra, a...
Ishana
Īśāna (ईशान).—m. (-naḥ) 1. A name of Siva. 2. Also of the same deity as regent of the north-eas...
Krishna
Kṛṣṇa (कृष्ण).—mfn. (-ṣṇaḥ-ṣṇā-ṣṇaṃ) Black or dark blue. m. (-ṣṇaḥ) 1. Black, the colour, or da...
Vasudeva
Vāsudevā is the name of a deity depicted at the Ranganathaswamy Temple in Srirangam (Śrī R...
Naga
Nāga (नाग) represents “state of desirelessness”, referring to one of the attributes of Lord Śiv...
Kosha
Kośa (कोश).—m. (-śaḥ) 1. An egg. 2. Wrought or unwrought gold or silver plate, jewellery. 3. An...
Badara
Badara (बदर) is the name of a sacred place as mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa 1.12, “somehow men mu...
Vata
Vaṭa (वट).—Subst. mfn. (-ṭaḥ-ṭī-ṭaṃ) A string, a rope, a tie. m. (-ṭaḥ) 1. The large Indian fig...
Asara
Asāra (असार).—a. [na. ba.]1) Sapless, insipid.2) (a) Without essence, useless; असारः खलु संसारः...
Dharana
Dharaṇa (धरण).—mn. (-ṇaḥ-ṇaṃ) 1. Holding, possessing, having. 2. A sort of measure, a weight of...
Kalpa
Kalpa (कल्प) in a precise sense means a vast cosmic period but this seems to have been a later ...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: