Sikka, Sikkā, Shikka: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Sikka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sikkā : (f.) pingo-basket.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Sikkā, (f.) (cp. Sk. śikyā) string, string of a balance Vin. II, 110; 131, J. I, 9; II, 399; III, 13 (text sikkhā); VI, 242; VvA. 244 (muttā° string of pearls); Kvu 336 sq. (Page 708)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

śikkā (शिक्का).—m ( A) A coining die. 2 The royal signet or seal; a seal or stamp in general. 3 The stamp or impression produced by the coining die or by a seal or stamp. 4 Applied freely to a mark or figure upon cloth, a fruit, the body &c.; to the mark of inoculation &c. 5 The seed-vessel of the pōśērēṃ a large and red variety of the lotus.

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sikkā (सिक्का).—These, although, etymologically, more correct as thus written, are, more commonly, written with śi.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

śikkā (शिक्का).—m A coining-die. The royal seal. A stamp, stamp-die.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Sikkā (सिक्का):—(nm) a coin, coinage; lead; ~[baṃda] sealed; standard; —[jamanā/baiṭhanā] to acquire sway, to come to wield tremendous influence (over); —[mānatā] to concede the superiority/supremacy/tremendous influence of.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Sikka (सिक्क) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Sṛkka.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Śikkā (ಶಿಕ್ಕಾ):—[noun] = ಶಿಕ್ಕೆ [shikke].

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Sikka (ಸಿಕ್ಕ):—

1) [noun] a net work of cords or thin ropes hung from above, used to keep kitchen items from the reach of children, cats, etc.

2) [noun] a network, small basket, bag, etc. tied to the mouth of a horse, cow or ox to prevent it from eating.

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Sikka (ಸಿಕ್ಕ):—[noun] = ಸಿಕ್ - [sik -] 2.

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Sikkā (ಸಿಕ್ಕಾ):—[noun] = ಸಿಕ್ಕೆ [sikke].

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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