Shrutadhara, aka: Śrutadhara, Shruta-dhara; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Shrutadhara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śrutadhara can be transliterated into English as Srutadhara or Shrutadhara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana

1a) Śrutadhara (श्रुतधर).—The companion who followed Puramjana to Uttara and Dakṣiṇa Pāñcāla; allegorically, the hearing.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IV. 25. 50-51; 29. 13.

1b) A class of people in Śālmalidvīpa.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 20. 11.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Śrutadhara (श्रुतधर) or Śrutadharadhāraṇī refers to a type of dharāṇī, according to the Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter X. The person who possesses this śrutadhara-dhāraṇī never forgets the words and the teachings that he has heard with his ears. Dhāraṇī refers to a set of five hundred qualities acquired by the Bodhisattvas accompanying the Buddha at Rājagṛha on the Gṛdhrakūṭaparvata.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of shrutadhara or srutadhara in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 639 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

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Mahidhara
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Shruta
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Payodhara
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Tuladhara
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Shrutakirti
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Dandadhara
Daṇḍadhara (दण्डधर) or Daṇḍadharāgama refers to one of upāgamas (supplementary scriptures) of t...
Sutradhara
Sūtradhara (सूत्रधर) or Sūtradhāra (सूत्रधार).—1) 'the threadholder', a stage-manager, the prin...
Gangadhara
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Jatadhara
Jatādhara (जताधर).—A warrior of Subrahmaṇya. (Mahābhārata Śalya Parva, Chapter 45, Verse 61).
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