Shriparvata, Śriparvata, Shri-parvata: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Shriparvata means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śriparvata can be transliterated into English as Sriparvata or Shriparvata, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Shriparvata in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत).—Name of a minor mountain (kṣudraparvata) situated in Bhārata, a region south of mount Meru, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 85. In the settlements (janapada) along these mountains dwell Āryas and Mlecchas who drink water from the rivers flowing there. Meru is one of the seven mountains located in Jambūdvīpa, which is ruled over by Āgnīdhra, a grandson of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत).—A sacred mountain. Those who go to this mountain and offer worship to Śaṅkara after bathing in the forest rivers get the same reward as from an Aśvamedhayāga. (Mahābhārata Vana Parva, Chapter 85, Verse 18).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Śriparvata (श्रिपर्वत).—Mt. a hill in India, fit for Śrāddha offerings;1 sacred to Śiva.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 23; III. 13. 28, 31; Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 92; 77. 28.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 181. 28.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत) refers to the name of a Tīrtha (pilgrim’s destination) mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. III.83.16). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Śrī-parvata) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत) is the name of a Tīrtha (holy places) mentioned in the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—The tīrtha named Śrīparvata is an auspicious abode of the Siddhas. On that mountain Siddhas and sages are seen everywhere. There is the liṅga—Śrīmallikārjuna where Śiva is ever present. A visit to this liṅga enables one to become Jīvanmukta. Any creature who dies there goes to the abode of Śiva.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Shriparvata in Kavya glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara

Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—Śrīparvata is a sacred spot, where have two temples, one is dedicated to Mallikārjuna Mahādeva and other to Bhramaramba Devi. Rājaśekhara identified this mountain in south India. Srisaila, which is situated near Kurnool and at a distance of fifty miles from the Kṛṣṇā station of the G.I.P Railways appears to be the same as Śrīparvata.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Shriparvata in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत) is another name for the Kaumara mountain (identified with Śrīśaila in Andhra) and refers to one of the ten places visited by the Goddess on her pilgrimage, according to Tantric texts such as the Kubjikāmata-tantra, the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, as the Goddess said: “I am (now) going again there to the Kula mountain in India that has been praised by those who know it as Śrīparvata from ages without beginning. (Also) called (mount) Kumāra, it is adorned with an umbrella for shade”.

2) Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत) symbolizes the “cavity of Brahmā” (Brahmarandhra), according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—The Wick (varti) is the Command. So the End of the Sixteen, said to be at the end of the Wick of Smoke, is at the extremity of the Command which is in the End of the Twelve. According to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā and its commentary, mount Śrīparvata is the Cavity of Brahmā where Dhūmāgni—‘Smoky Fire’—is located. This fire generates a column of smoke that extends upwards to a distance of twelve fingers above the head, corresponding to the series of levels that constitute the End of the Twelve described above. Above this is mount Kaumāra, which is the path that leads to the Cavity of Brahmā

3) Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत) is the name of a sacred place classified as a Upapīṭha, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—The eight seats are the main group of eight groups [i.e., Śrīparvata] of eight types of sacred sites. The figure sixty-four is a common ideal number as it is often configured into eight groups of eight.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdomlib Libary: Vajrayogini

Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत) is the name of a mountain associated with Kilakilārava: the north-western cremation ground (śmaśāna) according to the Vajravārāhī-sādhana by Umāpatideva as found in te 12th century Guhyasamayasādhanamālā. As a part of this sādhana, the practicioner is to visualize a suitable dwelling place for the goddess inside the circle of protection which takes the form of eight cremation grounds.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Shriparvata in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत) is the name of a mountain, according to chapter 5.2 [śāntinātha-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly, as Muni Kīrtidhara said to Kanakaśrī regarding her previous life:—“[...] One day in her wandering she [i.e., Śrīdattā] came to a mountain, Śrīparvata by name, which resembled the mountain of the gods (Meru) in beauty. There she saw a great Muni, named Satyayaśas, seated on a crystal rock, purified by the three controls, undefeated by trials hard to resist like ghouls, with the five kinds of carefulness unbroken, with an immeasurable wealth of penance, free from worldly interest, free from affection, tranquil, who regarded gold and a clod as the same, engaged in pure meditation, motionless as a mountain-peak. [...]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Geography in Ancient Indian inscriptions

1) Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत) is mentioned in an inscription found on the site of Nagarjunakonda. The Buddhist must have called this sacred spot parvata in immitation of the Hindu-parvata which is about but fifty miles from here as the crow flies. Fa-hien noted it as Paravata and subsequently he translated Paravata into Chinese Poloyu. He mentions that country all around is uncultivated and uninhabited. The country, all around, is even now barren. Thousands of monks and nuns must have lived here at one time.

2) Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत) refers to a minor hill (kṣudra-parvata) associated with the Mahendra ranges.—Śrīparvata is frequently mentioned in the inscriptions. Five inscriptions of the early rulers of the Ikṣvāku dynasty (225-360A.D.) refer to this mountain under the name Siripavata. One of these inscriptions describes the building of a Caitya-hall at Siripavata on the east side of Vijayapurī at the convent. Tal-gunda inscription of Kākusthavarman also mentions the Śrīparvata mountain. Some of the rulers of the Viṣṇukuṇḍin dynasty are described in their inscriptions as worshippers of lord of Śrīparvata.

Śrīparvata is usually identified by scholars with Siritana of the Nasik Praśasti. According to J. Burgess, Śrīparvata is identical with Śrīśailam in Kurnool district of Andhra Pradesh, on the south of the Krishna river, at the north-western extremity of Kurnool territory, about 102 miles West-south-west of Dharanikot and eighly-two miles East-north-east of Kumool and fifty miles from the Krishna Railway station.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shriparvata in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत).—Name of a mountain; Māl.1.

Derivable forms: śrīparvataḥ (श्रीपर्वतः).

Śrīparvata is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms śrī and parvata (पर्वत).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत).—[masculine] [Name] of [several] mountains.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śrīparvata (श्रीपर्वत):—[=śrī-parvata] [from śrī] m. Name of various mountains, [Mahābhārata; Suśruta; Purāṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] of a Liṅga, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

[Sanskrit to German]

Shriparvata in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shriparvata in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Śrīparvata (ಶ್ರೀಪರ್ವತ):—[noun] = ಶ್ರೀಗಿರಿ [shrigiri].

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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