Shringaverapura, Śṛṅgaverapura, Shringavera-pura: 6 definitions

Introduction:

Shringaverapura means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śṛṅgaverapura can be transliterated into English as Srngaverapura or Shringaverapura, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Shringaverapura in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Śṛṅgaverapura (शृङ्गवेरपुर).—A sacred place. Guha, ruler of this place ferried Rāma and Lakṣmaṇa across the river Gaṅgā. It became a holy spot by the touch of Śrī Rāma’s feet. (See under Guha).

Source: Srimatham: Śrī Rāmacaritamānasa

Śṛṅgaverapura (शृङ्गवेरपुर) or Siṅgaraura is the name of a city mentioned in the Rāmacaritamānasa chapter two (Ayodhya-kāṇḍa).—Accordingly, “when Bharata beheld the town of Śṛṅgaverapura, he was overpowered with emotion. Leaning on the Niṣāda chief it appeared as if meekness and love had taken a living form. In this way Bharata with all his army went and saw the stream of the Gaṅgā, which purifies the whole world. He made obeisance to the ghat where Śrī Rāma had bathed and said His prayers; and he was enraptured as if he had met Śrī Rāma Himself”.

The site of the ancient Śṛṅgaverapura is marked by a village bearing the same name under the modernized form ‘Singraur’ 22 miles to the north-west of Allahabad. The Gaṅgā has changed its course and only a small branch now flows through the old channel.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Śṛṅgaverapura (शृङ्गवेरपुर) refers to the name of a Tīrtha (pilgrim’s destination) mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. III.83.62). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Śṛṅgavera-pura) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of shringaverapura or srngaverapura in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geography

[«previous next»] — Shringaverapura in India history glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Geography of tourism A case study of Madhya Pradesh

The Ramayana traces the routes of Ramachandra’s sojourn in various regions at the time of his exile. It seems that from a place known as Srngaverapura 22 miles from Prayaga (U.P.) on the bank of the Ganges he bade goodbye to his charioteer.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of shringaverapura or srngaverapura in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shringaverapura in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śṛṅgaverapura (शृङ्गवेरपुर):—[=śṛṅga-vera-pura] [from śṛṅga-vera > śṛṅga] n. Name of a town (situated on the Ganges), [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

[Sanskrit to German]

Shringaverapura in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of shringaverapura or srngaverapura in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: