Shodhana, Śodhana, Sodhana: 20 definitions

Introduction

Shodhana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śodhana can be transliterated into English as Sodhana or Shodhana, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Śodhana (शोधन) refers to the “cleaning” of wounds, and is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā.

Source: PMC: Detoxification of Croton tiglium L. seeds

In Ayurveda, Śodhana is a unique process of detoxification which is employed partly to purify/detoxify and partly to potentiate the effect of various kinds of drugs used in Ayurvedic medicine with a view to reduce their toxic contents/effects as well as to enhance their therapeutic properties. Commonly used ingredients for Śodhana are cow's milk, cow's urine, ghee, and juice of few plants. Milk is considered as the best among all the media (Śodhanīya dravya) used in the Śodhana process.

Source: Ancient Science of Life: Yogaśataka of Pandita Vararuci

Śodhana (शोधन) refers to “eliminating therapy”, and is mentioned in the 10th century Yogaśataka written by Pandita Vararuci.—The Yogaśataka of Pandita Vararuci is an example of this category. This book attracts reader by its very easy language and formulations which can be easily prepared and have small number of herbs. It describes only those formulations (viz., Śodhana) which are the most common and can be used in majority conditions of diseases.

Treatment of three Doṣas is described in 97th to 99th stanzas. There are therapeutics described in one stanza for each Doṣa. 100th stanza related with Śodhana (Eliminating therapy) of particular Doṣas.

Source: Ancient Science of Life: Śodhana: An Ayurvedic process for detoxification

Śodhana (शोधन) refers to “detoxification/purification” prescribed for medicinal purposes involving poisonous drugs.—Ayurveda involves the use of drugs obtained from plants, animals, and mineral origin. All the three sources of drugs can be divided under poisonous and nonpoisonous category. There are various crude drugs, which generally possess unwanted impurities and toxic substances, which can lead to harmful health problems. Many authors have reported that not all medicinal plants are safe to use since they can bear many toxic and harmful phytoconstituents in them. Śodhana (detoxification/purification) is the process, which involves the conversion of any poisonous drug into beneficial, nonpoisonous/nontoxic ones. [...] Śodhana process involves the purification as well as reduction in the levels of toxic principles which sometimes results in an enhanced therapeutic efficacy.

In Ayurveda, Śodhana is in practice since the times of Caraka Saṃhitā, but its use expanded with the development of Rasaśāstra since 8th century CE. Śodhana process is specially designed for the drugs from mineral origin; however, it is recommended for all kinds of drugs to remove their doṣas (impurities or toxic content). It is cited in the treatises of Ayurveda that by the use of proper method of processing, viṣa can be converted into amṛta (nectar) and on other hand on adoption of inappropriate methods, nontoxic materials become a toxic. The concept of Śodhana in Ayurveda not only covers the process of purification/detoxifcation of physical as well as chemical impurities but also covers the minimization of side effects and improving the potency/therapeutic efficacy of the purified drugs.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Google Books: The Alchemical Body

Śodhana is the “(preliminary) purification” of mercury, its physical cleansing through washing, melting, marinating, and roasting it in various preparations.

Source: PMC: Śodhana: An Ayurvedic process for detoxification and modification

Śodhana (detoxification/purification) is the process, which involves the conversion of any poisonous drug into beneficial, nonpoisonous/nontoxic ones. Śodhana process involves the purification as well as reduction in the levels of toxic principles which sometimes results in an enhanced therapeutic efficacy.

In Ayurveda, Śodhana is in practice since the times of Caraka Saṃhitā, but its use expanded with the development of Rasaśāstra since 8th century CE. Śodhana process is specially designed for the drugs from mineral origin; however, it is recommended for all kinds of drugs to remove their doṣās (impurities or toxic content). It is cited in the treatises of Ayurveda that by the used of proper method of processing, viṣa can be converted into amṛta (nectar) and on other hand on adoption of inappropriate methods, nontoxic materials become a toxic.

The concept of Śodhana in Ayurveda not only covers the process of purification/detoxifcation of physical as well as chemical impurities but also covers the minimization of side effects and improving the potency/therapeutic efficacy of the purified drugs.

Source: Academia.edu: Ayurveda and Pharmaceutics (rasashastra)

Śodhana (Detoxification or Purification):—Āyurvēda proposes some steps in the preparation of food, which are known as āhāra vidhi viśēṣayatana. Karaṇa or Saṃskaraṇa is one of them. Similarly the pharmaceutical tradition of Āyurvēda makes Śodhana of herbal and mineral substances as an obligatory process to make the medicaments safe and useful. Mercury, being the most important ingredient and potentially hazardous if not properly processed, became a pivotal ingredient in all the alchemical products. Therefore, very elaborate steps of detoxification were proposed for mercury. Moreover, many supernatural and unnatural phenomena were ascribed to its effects.

Source: CCRAS: Ayurvedic pharmacopoeia of India, Appendix I

Śodhana is the process which removes the impurities to some extent and helps in increasing the therapeutic values of the drugs.

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: archive.org: Sardhatrisatikalottaragama

Śodhana (शोधन) refers to “purification (of the earth)” which is prescribed as one of the operations/ preliminary ceremonies related to the kuṇḍa (“fire-pit”), according to the various Āgamas and related literature. Śodhana is mentioned in the Mataṅgapārameśvara (Kriyā-pāda, chap 4), Mṛgendra-āgama (Kriyā-pāda, chapter 6), Suprabheda-āgama (Kriyā-pāda, chapter 11), Pūrvakāraṇa-āgama (chapter 22), Dīpta-āgama (chapter 33) and the Cintya-āgama (chapter 10).

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Śodhana (शोधन):—“Calcination”, which is described in the literature of the art as shodhana, "purification", is the process used to prepare these bhasma for administration.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

The elder brother of Kapila, who later became Kapilamaccha (q.v.). His mother was Sadhini and his sister Tapana.

He entered the Order with Kapila, in the time of Kassapa Buddha, and lived in the forest, engaged in meditation, attaining arahantship soon after. DhA.iv.37; SNA.i.305f.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (S) next»] — Shodhana in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sodhana : (nt.) cleansing; correcting.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Sodhana, (nt.) (fr. sodheti) cleansing Vism. 276 (as f. °nā); examining J. I, 292; payment (see uddhāra) J. I, 321. (Page 725)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

śōdhana (शोधन).—n (S) Cleaning, cleansing, clarifying, refining, purifying, correcting; freeing from feculence, dross, impurity, inaccuracy &c. 2 In arithmetic. Subtraction: also reduction. 3 Payment (of debt), liquidation.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

śōdhana (शोधन).—n Cleaning, correcting; reduction; liquidation.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śodhana (शोधन).—a. (- f.) [शुध्-णिच्-ल्यु ल्युट् वा (śudh-ṇic-lyu lyuṭ vā)] Purifying, cleansing &c.

-nam 1 (a) Purifying, cleansing. (b) Cleansing or washing of a wound.

2) Correction, clearing away errors; (śapathaṃ) करोतु परिषन्मध्ये शोधनार्थं ममैव च (karotu pariṣanmadhye śodhanārthaṃ mamaiva ca) Rām.7.95.6.

3) Exact determination.

4) Payment, discharge, acquittance.

5) Expiation, atonement; अज्ञान- भुक्तं तूत्तार्यं शोध्यं वाप्याशु शोधनैः (ajñāna- bhuktaṃ tūttāryaṃ śodhyaṃ vāpyāśu śodhanaiḥ) Ms.11.16.

6) Refining of metals.

7) Retaliation, requital, punishment.

8) Subtraction (in math.).

9) Green vitriol.

1) Feces, ordure.

11) Removal, eradication; कष्टकानां च शोधनम् (kaṣṭakānāṃ ca śodhanam) Ms.1.115.

-naḥ The lime.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śodhana (शोधन).—mfn.

(-naḥ-nā-naṃ) Cleaning, purifying &c., that which cleanses, refines, &c. n.

(-naṃ) 1. Cleaning, cleansing, purifying. 2. Correcting, freeing from faults or errors. 3. Correcting, as a writing. 4. Subtraction, (in arithmetic.) 5. The refining of metals. 6. A sort of refining, practised for chemical or medical purposes: exposing the metals to heat, and then sprinkling them with the urine of cows, &c. 7. Payment, acquittance. 8. Feces, ordure. 9. Green vitriol. 10. Determination. 11. Punishment. 12. Expiation. m.

(-naḥ) The lime. f. (-nī) A broom. E. śudh to be make pure, aff. lyuṭ or yuc .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śodhana (शोधन).—i. e. śudh + ana, I. adj. Cleaning, purifying. Ii. m. The lime. Iii. f. , A broom. Iv. n. 1. Cleaning, removing what may be prejudicial, [Hitopadeśa] 97, 15; purifying. 2. Expiation, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 11, 125. 3. Punishment, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 1, 115. 4. Correcting from faults. 5. Rooting up, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 9, 253. 6. Precise determination, [Vedāntasāra, (in my Chrestomathy.)] in Chr. 212, 11. 7. The refining of metals. 8. Payment, acquittal. 9. Fæces, ordure. 10. Green vitriol.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śodhana (शोधन):—[from śoddhavya] mfn. cleaning, purifying, cleansing, refining, purgative, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata; Suśruta]

2) [v.s. ...] m. the citron tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Alangium Hexapetalum, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [from śoddhavya] n. the act of cleaning, purifying, correcting, improving, [Nirukta, by Yāska; Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Mahābhārata] etc.

5) [v.s. ...] refining (as of metals for chemical or medicinal purposes), [Horace H. Wilson]

6) [v.s. ...] a means of purification, [Manu-smṛti; Suśruta]

7) [v.s. ...] clearing up, sifting, investigation, examination, correction, [Kāmandakīya-nītisāra; Hitopadeśa; Yājñavalkya [Scholiast or Commentator]]

8) [v.s. ...] payment, acquittance, [Horace H. Wilson]

9) [v.s. ...] justifying, exculpating, [Rāmāyaṇa]

10) [v.s. ...] expiation, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

11) [v.s. ...] retaliation, punishment, [ib.]

12) [v.s. ...] removal, eradication, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

13) [v.s. ...] (in [arithmetic]) subtraction, [Bījagaṇita]

14) [v.s. ...] excrement, ordure, [ib.]

15) [v.s. ...] green vitriol, [ib.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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