Shivapada, Śivapada, Shiva-pada: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Shivapada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śivapada can be transliterated into English as Sivapada or Shivapada, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Shivapada in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Śivapada (शिवपद) refers to “Śiva’s feet”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.8.—Accordingly, Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“On hearing your words the couple thought them true. Both Menā and Himavat were much distressed. O sage, on hearing your words, and inferring that indications referred to Śiva, Pārvatī’s joy knew no bounds. Convinced that Nārada’s words could not be false, Śivā turned her mind and love to Śiva’s feet [i.e., śivapada-dvandva]. The lord of mountains who was very much grieved in mind spoke to you, ‘O Nārada, O sage, what is the way out? What shall I do? A great misery has befallen us’. On hearing that, O sage, you who are eloquent in speech, delighted Himavat by your sweet words of auspicious import and spoke to console him”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Shivapada in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Śivapada (शिवपद) refers to the “level of the (highest) Śiva”, according to the Jñānaratnāvalī, (p. 266).—Accordingly, “In that case, for the one who desires [enjoyments and supernatural powers] the sakāmā [initiation] [first] bestows the pleasures of the pure universe and immediately after that the level of the [highest] Śiva (śivapada-pradā)”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shivapada in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śivapada (शिवपद).—final liberation, emancipation.

Derivable forms: śivapadam (शिवपदम्).

Śivapada is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms śiva and pada (पद).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śivapada (शिवपद):—[=śiva-pada] [from śiva] n. final liberation, emancipation, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shivapada in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Śivapada (ಶಿವಪದ):—

1) [noun] the feet of Śiva.

2) [noun] the final emancipation of the soul from the worldly life.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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