Shikhi, Sikhī, Śikhi, Sikhi, Śikhī: 15 definitions

Introduction

Shikhi means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śikhi and Śikhī can be transliterated into English as Sikhi or Shikhi, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Śikhī (शिखी).—A nāga born in the Kaśyapa dynasty. (Udyoga Parva, Chapter 103, Verse 12).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Śikhī (शिखी).—One of the gods worshipped in housebuilding.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 253. 24.

1b) R. a chief river of Plakṣadvīpa.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 4. 11.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Śikhī (शिखी) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. V.101.12/V.103) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Śikhī) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Śikhi (शिखि):—Another name for Barhi, which is a Sanskrit word referring to the “peacock”. The meat of this animal is part of the māṃsavarga (‘group of flesh’), which is used throughout Ayurvedic literature.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Śikhī (शिखी) is another name for Śitāvarī, an unidentified medicinal plant, according to verse 4.50-52 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Note: Dr. J.K. Ojhā identifies Śitāvarī as Celosia argentea Linn (“plumed cockscomb”; of the Amaranthaceae family) while the commentator of the Rājanighaṇṭu identifies it with Blepharis edulis Pers (“uttanjan”; from the Acanthaceae family); both are quite apart from each other. Together with the names Śikhī and Śitāvarī, there are a total of fifteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Prācyā: Animals and animal products as reflected in Smṛti texts

Śikhi (शिखि) or Mayūra refers to the bird “Peacock” (Pavo cristatus).—Birds have been described in several ancient Sanskrit texts that they have been treated elaborately by eminent scholars. These birds [viz., Śikhi] are enumerated in almost several Smṛtis in context of specifying the expiations for killing them and their flesh being used as a dietary article to give satisfaction to the manes (Pitṛs) in Śrāddha rites. These are elaborated especially in the Manusmṛti, Parāśarasmṛti [chapter VI], Gautamasmṛti [chapter 23], Śātātapasmṛti [II.54-56], Uśānasmṛti [IX.10-IX.12], Yājñavalkyasmṛti [I.172-I.175], Viṣṇusmṛti [51.28-51.29], Uttarāṅgirasasmṛti [X.16].

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Śikhi (शिखि, “fire”):—Third of the six seats of the Svādhiṣṭhāna (2nd chakra). It is identified with the third of the seven worlds, named svarloka. Together, these seven seatsthey form the Brahmāṇḍa (cosmic egg). The Randhra seat points to the south-east. This seat is also known as Vahni (वह्नि).

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

Sikhi. The twentieth of the twenty four Buddhas.

He was born in the Nisabha pleasance in Arunavati, his father being the khattiya Aruna (Arunava) and his mother Pabhavati. He was so named because his unhisa stood up like a flame (sikha). For seven thousand years he lived in the household in three palaces - Sucanda, Giri, Vahana (BuA.p.201 calls them Sucanda kasiri, Giriyasa and Narivasabha) - his wife being Sabbakama and his son Atula. He left home on an elephant, practised austerities for eight months, was given milk rice by the daughter of Piyadassi setthi of Sudassananigama, and grass for his seat by Anomadassi. His Bodhi was a pundarika. His first sermon was preached in the Migacira pleasaunce near Arunavati, and his Twin Miracle was performed near Suriyavati under a campaka tree.

The Bodhisatta was Arindama, king of Paribhutta. Abhibhu and Sambhava were his chief disciples among monks, and Akhila (Makhila) and Paduma among nuns.

His constant attendant was Khemankara. Among his patrons were Sirivaddha and Canda (Nanda) among men, and Citta and Sugutta among women. His body was sixty cubits high, and he lived to the age of seventy thousand years, dying in Dussarama (Assarama) in Silavati. Over his relics was erected a thupa three leagues in height

(Bu.xxi.; BuA.201ff.; cf. D.ii.7; iii.195f.; J.i.41, 94; DhA.i.69; S.ii.9; Dvy.333).

Sikhi Buddha held the Patimokkha ceremony only once in six years (DhA.iii.236; cf. Sp.i.191).

For a visit paid by him to the Brahma world see Abhibhu. His name also occurs in the Arunavati Paritta (q.v.).

Sikhi Sutta. The process by which Sikhi Buddha, like the other Buddhas, reached Enlightenment. S.iii.9.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: archive.org: The Indian Buddhist Iconography

Śikhī (शिखी) (or Śikhīn) refers to one of the seven mortal Buddhas (mānuṣī) whose names appear last in the list of thirty-two Buddhas in Mahāyāna Buddhism.—The last seven Tathāgatas are well-known, and are designated by the Mahāyānist as Mānuṣī or “Mortal Buddhas”. When represented, the last seven Mortal Buddhas appear all alike; they are of one colour and one form, usually sitting cross-legged,with the right hand disposed in the Bhūmisparśa-mudrā (earth-touching attitute), which is the mudrā peculiar to Akṣobhya. [...] In paintings, the Mortal Buddhas [viz., Śikhī] have usually a yellow or golden complexion. [...] Sometimes they are represented as standing, in which case the appear under a distinguishing Bodhi Tree and with a distinguishing mudrā.

Śikhī is associated with the (Mortal) Buddhaśakti named Śikhimālinī, and together they bring into existence the (Mortal) Bodhisattva named Ratnadhara.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Śikhī (शिखी) refers to the second of the “seven Buddhas” (saptatathāgata) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 6). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., saptatathāgata and Śikhī). The work is attributed to Nagarguna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sikhī : (m.) fire; peacock.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

śikhī (शिखी).—m S (Poetry.) Fire. Ex. śikhī jasā vēṇu- vanīñca pēṭē || gāṛhāniyāñcē uṭhatī capēṭē ||. 2 A peacock: and śikhinī f A pea-hen.

--- OR ---

śikhī (शिखी).—a S Crested;--as a bird: also peaked;--as a mountain.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

śikhī (शिखी).—m A peacock. Fire. a Crested. Peaked.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Śikhī (शिखी).—name of a kind of magic: Divyāvadāna 636.26 (verse, in a list of names of vidyā).

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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