Shikhanda, Śikhaṇḍa, Sikhaṇḍa, Sikhanda: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Shikhanda means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śikhaṇḍa can be transliterated into English as Sikhanda or Shikhanda, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Śikhaṇḍa (शिखण्ड) refers to “locks of hair” left on the sides of the head, three of which is the prescribed appearance for boys, according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 23. It is composed of the words kuñcita (curved) and mūrdhaja (hair of the head). Providing masks is a component of nepathya (costumes and make-up) and is to be done in accordance with the science of āhāryābhinaya (extraneous representation).

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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General definition (in Hinduism)

[«previous next»] — Shikhanda in Hinduism glossary
Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Śikhaṇḍa (शिखण्ड) denotes a ‘tuft’ or ‘lock’, as a mode of wearing the hair, in the later Saṃhitās and the Brāhmaṇas.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shikhanda in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sikhaṇḍa : (m.) the crest of a peacock.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shikhanda in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

śikhaṇḍa (शिखंड).—m S The tail of the peacock. 2 Locks left on the crown or the sides of the head (of children) at the time of tonsure.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shikhanda in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śikhaṇḍa (शिखण्ड).—[śikhāmamati am-ḍ tasya netvam Tv.]

1) A lock of hair left on the crown or sides of the head at tonsure.

2) A peacock's tail; केकाभिर्नीलकण्ठस्तिरयति वचनं ताण्डवादुच्छिखण्डः (kekābhirnīlakaṇṭhastirayati vacanaṃ tāṇḍavāducchikhaṇḍaḥ) Māl.9.3.

3) A crest; आलोकयति पयोदान् प्रबलपुरोवातताडितशिखण्डः (ālokayati payodān prabalapurovātatāḍitaśikhaṇḍaḥ) V.4.8.

Derivable forms: śikhaṇḍaḥ (शिखण्डः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śikhaṇḍa (शिखण्ड).—m.

(-ṇḍaḥ) 1. The tail of a peacock. 2. Locks of hair left on the crown or the sides of the head, at the period of tonsure in children: see the next. E. śikhin a peacock or any crested object, am to be or belong to, ḍa aff. and the form irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śikhaṇḍa (शिखण्ड).— (cf. śikhā), m. 1. The tail of a peacock, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] [distich] 81. 2. Locks of hair left at the time of tonsure, hair, [Daśakumāracarita] in Chr. 179, 15; 180, 1.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śikhaṇḍa (शिखण्ड).—[masculine] a tuft of hair or a peacock’s tail.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śikhaṇḍa (शिखण्ड):—m. (cf. śikhā) a tuft or lock of hair left on the crown or sides of the head at tonsure, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa; Daśakumāra-carita]

2) any crest or plume or tuft, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

3) a peacock’s tail, [Vikramorvaśī]

4) a kind of plant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Śikhaṇḍa (शिखण्ड):—m. [Siddhāntakaumudī.249], b, [1 v. u.]

1) Haarstrang, -büschel [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 3, 3, 17.] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 3, 187.] [Medinīkoṣa ḍ. 37.] pl. [Taittirīyasaṃhitā 7, 3, 16, 2.] catuḥ adj. [Taittirīyabrāhmaṇa 1, 2, 1, 27. 3, 7, 6, 4] (catuḥkaparda [Ṛgveda 10, 114, 3]). abhitaḥ pucchakāṇḍaṃ śikhaṇḍāsthe [The Śatapathabrāhmaṇa 4, 5, 7, 5.] [Taittirīyasaṃhitā 5, 7, 15, 1.] manojñaśitikaṇṭhaśikhaṇḍacūḍa adj. [PAÑCAR. 3, 5, 7.] kīrṇa [Daśakumāracarita 59, 14. 60, 5.] —

2) Pfauenschwanz [Amarakoṣa 2, 5, 31.] [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [Medinīkoṣa] [Halāyudha 2, 87.] [Vikramorvaśī 81.] —

3) wohl eine best. Pflanze: vṛtrasya rudhirāccaiva śikhaṇḍāḥ pārtha jajñire . dvijātibhirabhakṣyāste [Mahābhārata 12, 10202.] — śikhaṇḍī f. gaṇa gaurādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 4, 1, 41.] Vgl. nīla .

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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