Shatka, Ṣaṭka: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Shatka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Ṣaṭka can be transliterated into English as Satka or Shatka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Ṣaṭka (षट्क) refers to a “sextet” (group of six—six aspects of the one reality), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “(There are) six sacred seats and bliss is sixfold. (But there is really only) one sacred seat, which is sixfold (i.e. the hexagon). The awakening of (this) sixfold reality takes place by contemplating the four states (represented by the four seats in the inner triangle). (There are) six sacred seats, six Siddhas, six goddesses and six paths (of manifestation). (The one reality possesses) six aspects, (it is) the sixfold gesture and the six-faced one (denoted by) the term ‘group of six’ (ṣaṭka). The knowledge of the group of six has been revealed by means of the thirty-six divisions of (these) six. (This) teaching, the essence of the sacred seats, has been explained as it truly is”.

2) Ṣaṭka (षट्क) refers to the “group of six (wheels)”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “The state of the Gander [i.e., haṃsagati] (arises) when all the energies (of the Moon) have dissolved away. The container of the world of the Gander is the first energy (of the Moon). Fierce (caṇḍā) she is Umā, the New Moon who illumines consciousness. The awakening of Kaula is its manifestation (udaya) (as) the deity of the group of six (Wheels) [i.e., ṣaṭka-devatā]. The deity is in the Tradition of the Cave and it is she who, by means (of her) modalities, is in the six (Wheels)”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (philosophy)

1) Ṣaṭka (षट्क) or Dikṣaṭka refers to “six (directions)”, according to the Vṛtti on the Īśvarapratyabhijñākārikā 1.5.6, 20-21.—Accordingly, “Moreover, [the existence of] the external object is refuted by a means of [valid] knowledge if it has parts, because of [the necessity then] of attributing to it contradictory properties, etc.; [and it is contradicted] in many ways if it has no parts, because [then] it must be in contact with the six directions (diś-ṣaṭka-yoga-ādi), etc.”.

2) Ṣaṭka (षट्क) or Dhātuṣaṭka refers to “six (elements)”, according to the Īśvarapratyabhijñāvivṛtivimarśinī 1.93.—Accordingly, “Even though for a [follower of] Sāṅkhya, the twenty-five principles are manifest [as the universe], to begin with, experience, that is, immediate perception, consists in nothing but this: the sole five elements and consciousness—and nothing more. This is why for the master [Bhartṛhari], the universe is [entirely] explained as soon as the six elements are explained (dhātu-ṣaṭka-nirūpaṇa)—it is with this intention that he has undertaken their Examination (Samīkṣā). [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Satka.—(EI, 1, 13; IA 17), Sanskritised from Prakrit santaka; ‘the holding of…’, ‘belonging to…’. Note: satka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ṣaṭka (षट्क).—n An aggregate of six.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ṣaṭka (षट्क).—a.

1) Sixfold.

2) Bought for six &c.; P.V.1.22.

-kaḥ Six.

-kam 1 An aggregate of six; मासषट्क, पूर्वषट्क, उत्तरषट्क (māsaṣaṭka, pūrvaṣaṭka, uttaraṣaṭka) &c.

2) The six passions collectively viz. काम, मद, मान, लोभ, हर्ष (kāma, mada, māna, lobha, harṣa), and रुषा (ruṣā)).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṣaṭka (षट्क).—mfn.

(-ṭkaḥ-ṭkā-ṭkaṃ) 1. Six. 2. Having six-fold, &c. n.

(-ṭkaṃ) An aggregate of six. E. ṣaṣ six, and kan poss. aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṣaṭka (षट्क).—i. e. ṣaṣ + ka, I. adj. Six, sixfold. Ii. n. An aggregate of six, Pañc, 5, 12; Bhāṣāp. 31.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṣaṭka (षट्क).—[adjective] consisting of six; [neuter] hectade.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ṣaṭka (षट्क):—[from ṣaṣ] mfn. consisting of six, [Lāṭyāyana; Ṛgveda-prātiśākhya; Suśruta] etc. (dvi-ṣaṭka = 12 [Mahābhārata])

2) [v.s. ...] bought for six etc., [Pāṇini v, 1, 22]

3) [v.s. ...] occurring for the sixth time, doing anything for the sixth time, [ib. v, 2, 77], [vArttika]

4) [v.s. ...] m. six, [Gaṇitādhyāya]

5) [v.s. ...] n. a hexade or aggregate of six (ifc. after another numeral e.g. nava-ṣaṭka, ‘consisting of nine hexades’), [Nirukta, by Yāska; Āśvalāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Mahābhārata] etc.

6) [v.s. ...] the six passions collectively (viz. kāma, mada, māna, lobha, harṣa, and ruṣā), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṣaṭka (षट्क):—[(ṭkaḥ-ṭkā-ṭkaṃ) a.] Six, having six, six-fold.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Ṣaṭka (षट्क) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Chakka, Saṃtia, Saṃtiga.

[Sanskrit to German]

Shatka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Ṣaṭka (ಷಟ್ಕ):—[noun] a group or set of six (of the same kind).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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