Shatarudriya, Śatarudriya, Śatarudrīya, Shata-rudriya: 8 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Shatarudriya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śatarudriya and Śatarudrīya can be transliterated into English as Satarudriya or Shatarudriya, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous (S) next»] — Shatarudriya in Shaivism glossary
Source: Manblunder: Sri Rudram Introduction

Śatarudrīya (शतरुद्रीय):—It is also said that gods are satiated if  Śrī Rudram  is chanted and hence it is also called Śatarudrīya, which means extolling one hundred ways of glorifying Rudra.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (S) next»] — Shatarudriya in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Śatarudriya (शतरुद्रिय) or Śatarudriyamantra is the name of a mantra that is chanted during Dhārāpūjā, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.14:—“ after performing the regular worship of Śiva, with great devotion in accordance with prescribed rules, the devotees shall pour water in a continuous stream (jaladhārā). This Dhārā worship [viz., Dhārāpūjā] is very efficacious in delirium due to fever (jvarapralāpa). At that time Śatarudriya-mantra, [... etc.,] shall be repeated. The Dhārā worship [viz., Dhārāpūjā] is very excellent in regard to flourishing series of pleasures. [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Śatarudrīya (शतरुद्रीय).—A portion of the Vedic (Yajus) literature except which the Trayī exists until the pralaya;1 here the Rudras partake of the offerings;2 sacred to pitṛs;3 Citrakarma, the Gaṇeśvara taught this to Madana;4 japa at Benares leads one to eternal beatitude;5 identified with Śiva.6

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 59. 57.
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 9. 84.
  • 3) Matsya-purāṇa 22. 35.
  • 4) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 32. 63; IV. 7. 49; 11. 30-33; 34. 52.
  • 5) Matsya-purāṇa 184. 56.
  • 6) Vāyu-purāṇa 30. 244.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

[«previous (S) next»] — Shatarudriya in Hinduism glossary
Source: Springer: The Śatarudriya

The Śatarudriya (शतरुद्रिय), constituting the sixty-six subdivisions of chapter 16 of the Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā, is a litany accompanying no less than 425 oblations and addressed to the hundred forms and powers of the god Rudra.

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous (S) next»] — Shatarudriya in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śatarudriya (शतरुद्रिय).—

1) a Vedic text (rudrādhyāyaḥ -'namaste rudramanyave' iti yājuṣaḥ prapāṭhakaḥ); गृणन्तौ वेदविद्वांसौ तद्व्रह शतरुद्रियम् (gṛṇantau vedavidvāṃsau tadvraha śatarudriyam) Mb.7.81.13;7.22.12.

2) a particular Śiva-stotra in the Mahābhārata; देवदेवस्य ते पार्थ व्याख्याः शतरुद्रियम् (devadevasya te pārtha vyākhyāḥ śatarudriyam) Mb.7.22.48.

Derivable forms: śatarudriyam (शतरुद्रियम्).

Śatarudriya is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms śata and rudriya (रुद्रिय).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Śatarudriya (शतरुद्रिय) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—Taittirīyasaṃhitā 4, 5, 1-11. W. p. 38. L. 961. Haug. 36. Oppert. 7412. See Rudra.
—[commentary] by Bhāskaramiśra. Burnell. 6^b.
—[commentary] by Sāyaṇa. L. 961. Haug. 36. Burnell. 7^b. Śatarudriya Ṛṣichandas. P. 5. This ought to mean a statement of the ṛṣis and metres in the Śatarudriya.

2) Śatarudriya (शतरुद्रिय):—Taittirīya. Rgb. 28.
—Vs. Oudh. Xx, 4. See Śatādhyāya.

3) Śatarudriya (शतरुद्रिय):—from the Droṇaparvan of the Mahābhārata. Cr. Io. 846. No. 3286.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śatarudriya (शतरुद्रिय):—[=śata-rudriya] [from śata] mfn. belonging or sacred to a h° Rudras, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā] (‘much celebrated’ [Mahīdhara])

2) [v.s. ...] n. (with or [scilicet] brahman) Name of a celebrated hymn and prayer of the Yajur-veda addressed to Rudra (Śiva) in his hundred aspects (occurring in [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā xvi, 1-66]), [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa; Kāṭhaka] etc. (cf. [Religious Thought and Life in India 76])

3) [v.s. ...] Name of an Upaniṣad

4) Śatarudrīya (शतरुद्रीय):—[=śata-rudrīya] [from śata] mfn. having a h° Rudras as divinity, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] n. a hymn of the Yajurveda (= -rudriya q.v.), [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Taittirīya-brāhmaṇa; Mahābhārata]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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