Shatakratu, Śatakratu, Shata-kratu: 9 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Shatakratu means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śatakratu can be transliterated into English as Satakratu or Shatakratu, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Shatakratu in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Śatakratu (शतक्रतु).—A name of Indra;1 killed the pupils of Sukarma for adhyaya during anadhyaya.2

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa IV. 19. 2; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 24. 38; Vāyu-purāṇa 91. 63; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 9. 134; V. 10. 19.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 61. 29.

1b) The name of Vyāsa in the 7th dvāpara; his original name, Vibhu; the avatār of the lord Jaigiṣavya.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 23. 135.

1c) Nara, a brother of Ādityas.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 61.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shatakratu in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

śatakratu (शतक्रतु).—m (S) A name of Indra. 2 A hundred Ashwamedhas or sacrifices of a horse. The performance of them entitles the performer to the place and title of Indra. Hence (also generally with irionical implication) a mighty great feat; a mighty exploit or achievement.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shatakratu in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śatakratu (शतक्रतु).—an epithet of Indra; अपूर्णमेकेन शतक्रतूपमः शतं क्रतूनामपविघ्नमाप सः (apūrṇamekena śatakratūpamaḥ śataṃ kratūnāmapavighnamāpa saḥ) R.3.38.

Derivable forms: śatakratuḥ (शतक्रतुः).

Śatakratu is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms śata and kratu (क्रतु).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śatakratu (शतक्रतु).—m.

(-tuḥ) Indra. E. śata a hundred, kratu sacrifice; a hundred Ashwa-Medhas or sacrifices of an unbroken horse, elevating the sacrificer to the place and title of Indra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śatakratu (शतक्रतु).—I. adj. honoured by a hundred sacrifices (), Chr. 298, 23 = [Rigveda.] i. 112, 23. Ii. m. a name of Indra, [Pañcatantra] i. [distich]; 88.

— Cf. etc.; Gradivus, [Gothic.] hardu (a, not tn, on account of the aff. tu being based on tva).

Śatakratu is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms śata and kratu (क्रतु).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śatakratu (शतक्रतु).—[adjective] having a hundred forces; [masculine] [Epithet] of Indra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śatakratu (शतक्रतु):—[=śata-kratu] [from śata] mfn. (śata-.) having h°-fold insight or power or a h° counsels etc., [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] containing a h° sacrificial rites (ekona-śata-kr, one who has made 99 sacrifices), [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa; Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] m. Name of Indra (a h° Aśva-medhas elevating the sacrificer to the rank of Indra; cf. [Greek] ἑκατομβαῖος), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc. (cf. kṣiti-śatakr)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śatakratu (शतक्रतु):—[śata-kratu] (tuḥ) 2. m. Indra.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Śatakratu (शतक्रतु):—

1) adj. hundertfachen Rath, Einsicht, Kraft u. s. w. habend: Indra [Ṛgveda 1, 30, 1. 51, 2. 2, 22, 4. 8, 1, 11. 66, 1.] śa.amūtiṃ śa.akratum [88, 8.] [Atharvavedasaṃhitā 6, 30, 1. 82, 1.] [Vājasaneyisaṃhitā 3, 49.] die Gandharva [Śāṅkhāyana’s Śrautasūtrāṇi 4, 10, 1.] Heilkräuter: adhā śatakratvo (vgl. [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 7, 3, 109, Vārttika von Kātyāyana., Scholiast]) yū.ami.aṃ me aga.aṃ kṛta [Ṛgveda 10, 97, 2.] hundert Opferhandlungen enthaltend: sattra [The Śatapathabrāhmaṇa 11, 5, 5, 12.] ekona der 99 Opfer dargebracht hat [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 4, 19, 32.] —

2) m. ein N. Indra's [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 173.] [Weber’s Indische Studien 3, 372.] [Mahābhārata 3, 1725. 3062.] [Rāmāyaṇa 1, 49, 6. 2, 81, 15.] [Raghuvaṃśa 3, 38. 49.] [Śākuntala 157.] [Spr. 3337.] [Mārkāṇḍeyapurāṇa 79, 6] [?(pl.). Bhāgavatapurāṇa 4, 16, 24. 19, 2. 6, 8, 40. Vyāsa] saptame parivarte [Oxforder Handschriften 52], a, 41. kṣiti so v. a. Fürst, König [Rājataraṅgiṇī 3, 329.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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