Shashi, aka: Sasī, Śaśi, Sasi, Sāsi, Śaśī, Śaṣi, Shasi; 10 Definition(s)

Introduction

Shashi means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śaśi and Śaśī and Śaṣi can be transliterated into English as Sasi or Shashi, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Shashi in Purana glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

1a) Śaśi (शशि).—A son of Andhaka.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 44. 61.

1b) Moon;1 chariot of, described; relation of, to the sun cosmology; his nectar and its use to gods, ṛṣis and pitṛs;2 his maṇḍala twice that of the sun;3 vanquished by Rāvaṇa.4

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 93. 13.
  • 2) Ib. 126. 48-73.
  • 3) Ib. 124. 8.
  • 4) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 21. 8; 24. 67; III. 7. 254.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Śaśi (शशि, “monday”) corresponds with the moon and refers to the second of seven vāra (days), according to the Mānasāra. It is also known by the name Soma or Candra. Vāra is the fifth of the āyādiṣaḍvarga, or “six principles” that constitute the “horoscope” of an architectural or iconographic object. Their application is intended to “verify” the measurements of the architectural and iconographic object against the dictates of astrology that lay out the conditions of auspiciousness.

The particular day, or vāra (eg., śaśi) of all architectural and iconographic objects (settlement, building, image) must be calculated and ascertained. This process is based on the principle of the remainder. An arithmetical formula to be used in each case is stipulated, which engages one of the basic dimensions of the object (breadth, length, or perimeter/circumference). Among these vāras, Guru (Thursday), Śukra (Friday), Budha (Wednesday) and Śaśi or Candra (Monday), are considered auspicious and therefore, to be preferred. The text states, however, that the inauspiciousness of the other three days are nullified if there occurs a śubhayoga, “auspicious conjunction (of planets)” on those days.

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra
Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Śaśī (शशी) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (eg., śaśī) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Śaṣi (शषि).—The Moon. Note: Śaṣi is a Sanskrit technical term used in ancient Indian sciences such as Astronomy, Mathematics and Geometry.

Source: Wikibooks (hi): Sanskrit Technical Terms
Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Śaśi (शशि) is the name of a deity who received the Suprabhedāgama from Vighneśa who in turn, received it from Daśeśa through the mahānsambandha relation, according to the pratisaṃhitā theory of Āgama origin and relationship (sambandha). The suprabheda-āgama, being part of the ten Śivabhedāgamas, refers to one of the twenty-eight Siddhāntāgamas: a classification of the Śaiva division of Śaivāgamas. The Śaivāgamas represent the wisdom that has come down from lord Śiva, received by Pārvatī and accepted by Viṣṇu.

Śaśi obtained the Suprabhedāgama from Vighneśa who in turn obtained it from Daśeśa who in turn obtained it from Sadāśiva through parasambandha. Śaśi then, through divya-sambandha transmitted it to the Devas who, through divyādivya-sambandha, transmitted it to the Ṛṣis who finally, through adivya-sambandha, revealed the Suprabhedāgama to human beings (Manuṣya). (also see Anantaśambhu’s commentary on the Siddhāntasārāvali of Trilocanaśivācārya)

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Shashi in Pali glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

sasī : (m.) the moon. || sāsi (aor. of sāsati), taught; instructed; ruled.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

śaśi (शशि).—m The moon.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sāsi (सासि).—a. Armed with a sword; also सासिपाण-हस्त (sāsipāṇa-hasta).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śaśī (शशी).—n. of an apsaras: Kv 3.18.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 69 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Shashibhushana
Śaśibhūṣaṇa (शशिभूषण).—m., Derivable forms: śaśibhūṣaṇaḥ (शशिभूषणः).Śaśibhūṣaṇa is a Sanskrit c...
Shashivadana
Śaśivadanā (शशिवदना).—f. (-nā) 1. A woman with a face like the moon. 2. A species of the Gayatr...
Shashirekha
Śaśirekhā (शशिरेखा) is the name of a Vidyādharī and one of the four daughters of king Śaśikhaṇḍ...
Shashimandala
Śaśimaṇḍalā (शशिमण्डला) refers to one of the eight wisdoms (vidyās) described in the ‘guhyamaṇḍ...
Candra
Candra (चन्द्र).—m. (-ndraḥ) 1. The moon considered as a planet or a deity. 2. Camphor. 3. Wate...
Soma
Soma.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘one’. Note: soma is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can ...
Surya
Sūrya (सूर्य) or Sūryya.—m. (-ryaḥ) 1. The sun. 2. Gigantic swallow wort, (Asclepias gigantea.)...
Guru
Guru (गुरु) refers to an “elder” or “preceptor”, as mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa-māhātmya chapte...
Mangala
Maṅgala (मङ्गल).—(1) adj., greeting festively, honoring, ifc. (so Senart): buddha-dharma-saṃgh...
Shukra
Śukra (शुक्र).—m. (-kraḥ) 1. The planet Venus or its regent, the son of Bhrigu, and preceptor o...
Vara
Vara (वर).—mfn. (-raḥ-rā-raṃ) 1. Best, excellent. 2. Eldest. m. (-raḥ) 1. A boon, a blessing, e...
Chaya
Chāyā (छाया).—f. (-yā) 1. Shade. 2. Shadow, reflected image. 3. The wife of the sun. 4. Beauty,...
Nakshatra
Nakṣatra (नक्षत्र).—n. (-tra) 1. A star in general. 2. An asterism in the moon’s path or lunar ...
Karpura
Karpūra (कर्पूर) refers to “camphor”, the powder thereof forms a preferable constituent fo...
Shani
Śani (शनि, “saturn”) or Śanaiścara refers to one of the Navagraha (“nine planetary divinities”)...

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