Shashanka, Śaśāṅka, Sasanka, Sashanka, Shasha-anka, Shashamka, Sashamka: 21 definitions

Introduction:

Shashanka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śaśāṅka can be transliterated into English as Sasanka or Shashanka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Shashanka in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क) refers to the “moon”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.18 (“Description of the perturbation caused by Kāma”).—Accordingly, as Śiva described Pārvatī: “Is this your face or the moon [i.e., śaśāṅka]? Are these your eyes or lotus petals? These two eyebrows are the bows of Kāma of noble soul. Is this your lower lip or Bimba fruit? Is this your nose or the beak of a parrot? Do I hear your voice or the cooing of the cuckoo? Is this your slender waist or the sacrificial altar? How can her gait be described? How can her comely appearance be described? How can the flowers be described? How can the clothes be described? [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क).—The Moon God; see Soma.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 150. 53.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Shashanka in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क) refers to the “moon” according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “[...] (1) The Foundation (ādhāra) (at the base of the spine) is the first Wheel (brilliant and coloured) like red lac. There, in the middle, is the one called Haṃsa, (shining white) like a multitude of moons [i.e., śaśāṅka-gaṇa-sannibha]. [...] (Perfect) contemplation (samādhi) is with (these) sixteen aspects and is (attained) within the form of the sixfold deposition (ṣoḍhānyāsa). He who knows this is (a veritable) Lord of Yogis, the others (who do not) are (just) quoting from books. Once attained the plane that is Void and Non-void, the yogi is freed from bondage”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क) refers to the “moon”, according to the King Vatsarāja’s Pūjāstuti called the Kāmasiddhistuti (also Vāmakeśvarīstuti), guiding one through the worship of the Goddess Nityā.—Accordingly, “[...] May the three-eyed goddess Bhagamālinī give the glory of good fortune. She possesses abundant miraculous power and is as lovely as the moon (śaśāṅka-rucirā). She is stationed in the left corner [of the central triangle] and holds in the row of her arms a snare, a goad, a sugarcane, ropes, a book, and a sword. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

[«previous next»] — Shashanka in Jyotisha glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क) refers to the “moon”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 3), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “The dark spots, also known as ketus, the sons of Rāhu are Tāmasa, Kīlaka and the like, and are 33 in number. How they affect the earth depends upon their color, position and shape. If these spots should appear on the solar disc, mankind will suffer miseries; if on the lunar disc mankind will be happy; but if they take the shape of a crow, a headless human body, or a weapon, mankind will suffer even though the spots should appear on the moon [i.e., śaśāṅka]”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (tantric Buddhism)

Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क) refers to the “moon”, according to the Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī by Vilāsavajra, which is a commentary on the Nāmasaṃgīti.—Accordingly, [while describing Mañjuśrī-jñānasattva]—“[Next] he should visualise himself as the fortunate one, the gnosis-being [Mañjuśrī], born from the syllable a situated in the middle of that [wisdom-] wheel [situated in the heart of the Ādibuddha]. He has six faces, is radiant like the autumn moon (śarat-śaśāṅka-prabha), with the best of sapphires in his beautiful hair, with a halo that has the brilliance of the orb of the newly risen sun, with all the tathāgatas as [head-]ornaments, immersed in meditative concentration, seated on a variagated lotus throne, in tranquil mood, with a pair of books of the Prajñāpāramitā above blue lotuses held in his two hands”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Shashanka in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Śaśāṅka] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Śaśāṅka.—(IE 7-71-2), ‘one’. Note: śaśāṅka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shashanka in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sasaṅka : (m.) the moon.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Sāsaṅka, (adj.) (fr. sa3+āsaṅkā) dangerous, fearful, suspicious S. IV, 175 (opp. khema); Th. 2, 343; ThA. 241; Vism. 107; J. I, 154; PvA. 13; Miln. 351. (Page 707)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shashanka in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

saśaṅka (सशंक).—a (S sa & śaṅkā) Fearful, timorous: also affected by fear, afraid. 2 Diffident, doubtful, scrupulous.

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sāśaṅka (साशंक).—a S (sa & āśaṅkā) Timid, fearful, apprehensive: also scrupulous, diffident, dubious, misgiving.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

śaśāṅka (शशांक).—m The moon.

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saśaṅka (सशंक).—a Fearful; afraid. Doubtful.

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sāśaṅka (साशंक).—a Timid, fearful. Dubious.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shashanka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sāśaṅka (साशङ्क).—a. Feeling fear, apprehensive, afraid, dismayed.

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Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क).—

1) the moon; रामाभिधानमपरं जगतः शशाङ्कम् (rāmābhidhānamaparaṃ jagataḥ śaśāṅkam) Pratimā 4.1.

2) camphor. °अर्धमुख (ardhamukha) a. crescent-headed (as an arrow). °मूर्तिः (mūrtiḥ) an epithet of the moon. -लेखा (lekhā) the digit of the moon, lunar crescent.

Derivable forms: śaśāṅkaḥ (शशाङ्कः).

Śaśāṅka is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms śaśa and aṅka (अङ्क).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क).—m.

(-ṅkaḥ) 1. The moon. 2. Camphor. E. śaśa a hare, aṅka a mark or spot.

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Saśaṅka (सशङ्क).—mfn.

(-ṅkaḥ-ṅkā-ṅkaṃ) Fearful, doubtful. E. sa with, śaṅkā fear.

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Sāśaṅka (साशङ्क).—f.

(-ṅkā) Disheartened, afraid.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sāśaṅkā (साशङ्का).—adj. disheartened, [Pañcatantra] 47, 15.

Sāśaṅkā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sa and āśaṅkā (आशङ्का).

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Saśaṅkā (सशङ्का).—adj. fearful, doubtful.

Saśaṅkā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sa and śaṅkā (शङ्का).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क).—[masculine] = śaśalakṣaṇa.

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Saśaṅka (सशङ्क).—[adjective] afraid, timid; [neuter] [adverb]

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Sāśaṅka (साशङ्क).—[adjective] afraid, suspicious.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क):—[from śaśa > śaś] a See below.

2) [from śaś] b m. ‘hare-marked’, the moon, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] camphor, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] Name of a king, [Harṣacarita [Scholiast or Commentator]]

5) Saśaṅka (सशङ्क):—[=sa-śaṅka] [from sa > sa-śakala] mf(ā)n. fearful, doubtful, timid, shy (am ind.), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

6) [v.s. ...] suspicious, [Kathāsaritsāgara]

7) Sāśaṅka (साशङ्क):—mf(ā)n. having fear or anxiety, apprehensive, afraid of ([locative case]; am ind. ‘apprehensively’), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śaśāṅka (शशाङ्क):—[śaśā+ṅka] (ṅkaḥ) 1. m. The moon.

2) Saśaṅka (सशङ्क):—[sa-śaṅka] (ṅkaḥ-ṅkā-ṅkaṃ) a. Afraid, doubtful.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Saśāṅka (सशाङ्क) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Saṃsaka.

[Sanskrit to German]

Shashanka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shashanka in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Śaśāṃka (ಶಶಾಂಕ):—[noun] = ಶಶಿ [shashi].

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Saśaṃka (ಸಶಂಕ):—[adjective] doubtful; uncertain; leading to suspect.

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Sāśaṃka (ಸಾಶಂಕ):—[adjective] hesitating; undecided, doubtful or disinclined; hesitant.

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Sāśaṃka (ಸಾಶಂಕ):—

1) [noun] the quality or fact of being hesitant, doubtful.

2) [noun] a man who is hesitant, doubting or disinclined.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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