Shankari, Śāṅkarī, Śāṅkari, Śaṅkarī: 8 definitions

Introduction

Shankari means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śāṅkarī and Śāṅkari and Śaṅkarī can be transliterated into English as Sankari or Shankari, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Śāṅkarī (शाङ्करी):—Another name for Ūrdhvakeśī, the Sanskrit name for one of the twenty-four goddesses of the Sūryamaṇḍala, according to the kubjikāmata-tantra.

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II) (shaivism)

Śaṅkarī (शङ्करी) is the name of a Goddess (Devī) presiding over Vārāṇasī: one of the twenty-four sacred districts mentioned in the Kubjikāmatatantra (chapter 22). Her weapon is the gadā. Furthermore, Śaṅkarī is accompanied by the Kṣetrapāla (field-protector) named Śāṅkara and their abode is an tāla-tree. A similar system appears in the 9th century Vajraḍākatantra (chapter 18).

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (S) next»] — Shankari in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

Śāṅkarī (शाङ्करी) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (eg., Śāṅkarī) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Śaṅkarī (शङ्करी).—Wife of Varatanu, the brahmin. (See under Varatanu for the reason why the couple had no children in their next life).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Śaṅkarī (शङ्करी).—The devī; became twins in the 26th kalpa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 21. 59.

2) Śāṅkarī (शाङ्करी).—A mind-born mother.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 16.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II)

Śaṅkarī (शङ्करी) or Śaṃkarī is the name of a Goddess (Devī) presiding over Dharaṇī: one of the twenty-four sacred districts mentioned in the 9th century Vajraḍākatantra (chapter 18). Her weapon is the gadā or gaya. Furthermore, Śaṅkarī is accompanied by the Kṣetrapāla (field-protector) named Ūrdhvakeśa and their abode is the tāla-tree.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śāṅkari (शाङ्करि).—

1) Name of Kārtikeya.

2) Of Gaṇeśā.

3) Fire.

Derivable forms: śāṅkariḥ (शाङ्करिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śāṅkari (शाङ्करि).—m.

(-riḥ) 1. Kartikeya. 2. Ganesa. 3. Fire. 4. A Muni. E. śaṅkara Siva, and iña patronymic aff.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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