Shalivahana, Śālivāhana, Shali-vahana: 12 definitions

Introduction:

Shalivahana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śālivāhana can be transliterated into English as Salivahana or Shalivahana, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

General definition (in Hinduism)

[«previous next»] — Shalivahana in Hinduism glossary
Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Śālivāhana (शालिवाहन) was a legendary emperor of ancient India, who is said to have ruled from Pratishthana (present-day Paithan, Maharashtra). He is believed to be based on a Satavahana king (or kings). In some legends, he is presented as an enemy of Vikramaditya; in other legends, he is named as a grandson of Vikramaditya; and in a few legends, the title Vikramaditya is applied to the ruler of Pratishthana.

The Viracharita (12th century CE) mentions Shalivahana as a rival of the king Vikramaditya of Ujjain. According to it, Shalivahana defeated and killed Vikramaditya, and then ruled from Pratishthana. Shudraka was a close associate of Shalivahana and his son Shakti Kumara. Later, Shudraka allied with Vikramaditya's successors and defeated Shakti Kumara. This legend is full of mythological stories.

The Bhavishya Purana says that the Paramara king Bhoja is described as a descendant of Shalivahana, who is named as a grandson of Vikramaditya. According to the text (3.1.6.45-7.4), the first Paramara king was Pramara, born from a fire pit at Mount Abu (thus belonging to the Agnivansha).

The Chola Purva Patayam (“ancient chola record”) says that Shalivahana (also known as Bhoja) was born in Ayodhya, in a potter’s house, by grace of Adi-Sheshan. When he grew up, he became a king and defeated Vikramaditya, marking the beginning of the Shalivahana calendar era. Shalivahana was a Shramana (possibly a Jain), and persecuted all those who refused to convert to his faith.Chola Purva Patayam dates Shalivahana's defeat to the year 1443 of an uncertain calendar era (possibly from the beginning of Kali Yuga).

India history and geography

Source: academia.edu: The Chronology of Ancient Gandhara and Bactria

The meteoric rise of King Shalivahana of Pratishthana around 640 BCE gave a political opportunity to the Khaharata Kshatraps (Kshatrapas) of Maharashtra. They supported Shalivahana in a war against Ujjain. King Shalivahana defeated the descendant of Vikramaditya I and became the powerful king of Dakshinapatha for a short period. He founded an era in 636 BCE, 2526 years after the epoch of Yudhishthira era and Mahabharata war (3162 BCE).

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shalivahana in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

śālivāhana (शालिवाहन).—m (S) The name of an ancient sovereign of India, the founder of an era still current and bearing his name. He arose about 78 A. D. From the significance of his name (śāli from śāla Shorea robusta, and vāhana A vehicle; he being represented as borne upon a cross of that or of other wood) and the time and circumstances of his birth, he is identified by Wilford with Christ.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

śālivāhana (शालिवाहन).—m The name of an ancient sovereign of India, the founder of an era still current.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shalivahana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śālivāhana (शालिवाहन).—Name of a celebrated sovereign of India whose era commences with 78 A. D.

Derivable forms: śālivāhanaḥ (शालिवाहनः).

Śālivāhana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms śāli and vāhana (वाहन).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śālivāhana (शालिवाहन).—m.

(-naḥ) A sovereign of India, whose capital was Pratishthana in the Dakshin, and institutor of the era now called Saka, beginning 76 or 78 years after Christ. E. śāli from śāla the Sal tree, or a proper name, that of a Yaksha transformed to a lion, on which the prince rode when an infant, and vāhana vehicle.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śālivāhana (शालिवाहन).—m. the name of a king.

Śālivāhana is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms śāli and vāhana (वाहन).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śālivāhana (शालिवाहन).—[masculine] [Name] of a king.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śālivāhana (शालिवाहन):—[=śāli-vāhana] [from śāli] m. Name of a celebrated sovereign of India (said to be so called either from having ridden on a Yakṣa called Śāli, or from Śalī for Śāla, the Śāl tree, Śāli-vāhana being represented as borne on a cross made of that or other wood; he was the enemy of Vikramāditya and institutor of the era now called Śaka q.v.; his capital was Pratiṣṭhāna on the Godāvarī), [Siṃhāsana-dvātriṃśikā or vikramāditya-caritra, jaina recension; Subhāṣitāvali; Buddhist literature]

2) Sālivāhana (सालिवाहन):—a sālavāhana or sālivāhana [varia lectio] for s, sātav and, śālav, [Siṃhāsana-dvātriṃśikā or vikramāditya-caritra, jaina recension]

3) b See sālav above.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śālivāhana (शालिवाहन):—[śāli-vāhana] (naḥ) 1. m. A sovereign of India, enemy of Vikramāditya, and institutor of the Shaka era.

[Sanskrit to German]

Shalivahana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shalivahana in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Śālivāhana (ಶಾಲಿವಾಹನ):—

1) [noun] (hist.) name of a king in whose name a system of reckoning time by numbering the years has started, known as Śalivāhana śaka).

2) [noun] a kind of worm.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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