Shaktism, aka: Śaktism; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Shaktism means something in the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

Śaktism in Rājasthān.—From both archaeological and epigraphic evidences it is clear that the mother-goddess was worshipped in Rājasthān in one form or another from the early age to the end of our period. Her chief forms that have come to light from the terra-cottas or inscriptional or archival references of early period are of varied characters, indicating her valour, anger and benevolence, which are manifested in Mātridevī, Mahiśāsuramardini, Durgā, Pārvatī, Yogeśvarī, Dadhimati, Kṣemakarī, Araṇyavāsinī, Vasundarā, Astamātrikā, Rādhikā, Lakṣmī, Bhagavatī, Nandā, Sarasvatī, Kātyāyinī, Vaṭayakṣiṇī, Ambikā, Kālī, Sañcikā and Yogeśvarī.

Source: archive.org: Social Life In Medieval Rajasthan

Śaktism (Devī-worship) during the reign of the Śilāhāra dynasty (r. 765-1215 A.D.).—Some temples of goddesses are also mentioned in Śilāhāra inscriptions. The most famous of them was the temple of Mahālakṣmī at Kolhāpur. Her temple is a star-shaped triple shrine, with Mahālakṣmī in the central garbhagṛha, and Mahākālī and Mahāsarasvatī in the shrine to her right and left respectively. It had already become famous as a well-known Śakta-pīṭha. These Śilahāras were her fervent devotees. They believed that they had obtained their kingdom by her grace; for they state in their grants that they had secured her gracious boon.

Source: What is India: Inscriptions of the Śilāhāras
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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