Shadanga, aka: Ṣaḍaṅga, Shash-anga; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Shadanga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Ṣaḍaṅga can be transliterated into English as Sadanga or Shadanga, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Shadanga in Purana glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) or Ṣaḍaṅgamantra is the name of a mantra that is chanted during Dhārāpūjā, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.14:—“ after performing the regular worship of Śiva, with great devotion in accordance with prescribed rules, the devotees shall pour water in a continuous stream (jaladhārā). This Dhārā worship [viz., Dhārāpūjā] is very efficacious in delirium due to fever (jvarapralāpa). At that time [...] Ṣaḍaṅga-mantra, [... etc.,] shall be repeated. The Dhārā worship [viz., Dhārāpūjā] is very excellent in regard to flourishing series of pleasures. [...]”.

Source: archive.org: Siva Purana - English Translation

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग).—The six limbs of the state including the king who must protect it with great care.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 220. 21; Vāyu-purāṇa 30. 293; 99. 39.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Ṣaḍaṅga (“six limbs”).—Dramatic performance in its entirety relates to the six limbs including the major and the minor ones.

The six major limbs (aṅga) are

  1. head (śiras),
  2. hands (hasta),
  3. breast (uras),
  4. sides (pārśva),
  5. waist (kaṭi),
  6. and feet (pāda).

The six minor limbs (upāṅga) are

  1. eyes (netra),
  2. eyebrows (bhrū),
  3. nose (nāsā),
  4. lower lip (adhara),
  5. cheek (kapola),
  6. and chin (cibuka).
Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Shadanga in Ayurveda glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) is another name for Kṣudragokṣura, a medicinal plant related with Gokṣura (Tribulus terrestris Linn.), according to verse 4.40-43 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. Note: Gokṣura is of two kinds i.e. with smaller and bigger fruits. Both these species have more than three spikes. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Ṣaḍaṅga and Kṣudragokṣura, there are a total of sixteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Shadanga in Marathi glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

ṣaḍaṅga (षडंग).—n S (ṣaṣ & aṅga) The six parts of the body; viz. the two arms, the two legs, the head, the waist. 2 The six supplementary parts of the Vedas; viz. grammar, prosody, astronomy, pronunciation, the meaning of unusual terms, and the ritual of the Hindu religion (vyākaraṇa, chanda, jyōtiṣa, nirukti, kalpasūtra, śikṣā).

--- OR ---

ṣaḍaṅga (षडंग).—a S Having six limbs or members. 2 Having six parts, constituents, or components.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ṣaḍaṅga (षडंग).—n The six parts of the body. The six supplementary parts of the vēda, vyākaraṇa, chanda &c. a Having six limbs or parts.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Shadanga in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग).—(misprinted Saḍ°), n. of a nāga king: Māy 246.19.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग).—mfn.

(-ṅgaḥ-ṅgī-ṅgaṃ) 1. Having six limbs or members. 2. Having six parts, six ingredients, &c. n.

(-ṅgaṃ) 1. Six parts of the body collectively; as the two arms, two legs, and the head and waist. 2. The six supplementary parts of the Vedas or grammar, prosody, astronomy, pronunciation, the meaning of unusual terms, and the ritual of the Hindu religion. E. ṣaṣ six, and aṅga a limb or part.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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