Shadanga, Ṣaḍaṅga, Shash-anga, Sadamga, Shadamga: 23 definitions

Introduction:

Shadanga means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Ṣaḍaṅga can be transliterated into English as Sadanga or Shadanga, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Shadanga in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

1) Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) or Ṣaḍaṅgamantra is the name of a mantra that is chanted during Dhārāpūjā, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.14:—“ after performing the regular worship of Śiva, with great devotion in accordance with prescribed rules, the devotees shall pour water in a continuous stream (jaladhārā). This Dhārā worship [viz., Dhārāpūjā] is very efficacious in delirium due to fever (jvarapralāpa). At that time [...] Ṣaḍaṅga-mantra, [... etc.,] shall be repeated. The Dhārā worship [viz., Dhārāpūjā] is very excellent in regard to flourishing series of pleasures. [...]”.

2) Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) refers to the “six Vedāṅgas”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.5.8 (“The detailed description of the chariot etc.”).—Accordingly, as Sanatkumāra narrated to Vyāsa: “The divine chariot of lord Śiva consisting of all the worlds was built by Viśvakarman with devoted effort. [...] O excellent sage, the cosmic sense-organs constituted the embellishments of this chariot on all sides. Faith was its movements. The six Vedāṅgas (ṣaḍaṅga) were its ornaments [tadānīṃ bhūṣaṇānyeva ṣaḍaṃgānyupabhūṣaṇam]. O great ones of good rites, the Purāṇas, Nyāya, Mīmāṃsā and Dharma Śāstras constituted the side trinkets. [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग).—The six limbs of the state including the king who must protect it with great care.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 220. 21; Vāyu-purāṇa 30. 293; 99. 39.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

Ṣaḍaṅga (“six limbs”).—Dramatic performance in its entirety relates to the six limbs including the major and the minor ones.

The six major limbs (aṅga) are

  1. head (śiras),
  2. hands (hasta),
  3. breast (uras),
  4. sides (pārśva),
  5. waist (kaṭi),
  6. and feet (pāda).

The six minor limbs (upāṅga) are

  1. eyes (netra),
  2. eyebrows (bhrū),
  3. nose (nāsā),
  4. lower lip (adhara),
  5. cheek (kapola),
  6. and chin (cibuka).
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Nighantu (Synonyms and Characteristics of Drugs and technical terms)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) is another name for Kṣudragokṣura, a medicinal plant related with Gokṣura (Tribulus terrestris Linn.), according to verse 4.40-43 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. Note: Gokṣura is of two kinds i.e. with smaller and bigger fruits. Both these species have more than three spikes. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Together with the names Ṣaḍaṅga and Kṣudragokṣura, there are a total of sixteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Kalpa (Formulas, Drug prescriptions and other Medicinal preparations)

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

ṣaḍaṅga refers to a medicinal recipe mentioned in the Kaṣāyakhaṇḍa (verse 1.5) of the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Kaṣāyakhaṇḍa [mentioning ṣaḍaṅga] deals with decoctions (kaṣāya) and gruels (peyas) administered to patients suffering from a variety of conditions (viz., alcoholism, vomiting, syncope, burning sensations, etc.).

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) refers to the “she who has six limbs”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “The subtle form of the goddess is Kuṇḍalinī. Her names in the three transmissions—Khañjinī, Vakrā and Kubjikā—all imply her identity as Kuṇḍalinī. [...] Resting on the Kula, she has three natures and six limbs and faces [i.e., ṣaḍaṅga-vaktra-saṃyutā]. Profoundly tranquil and very terrible, she sits on the Great Ghost who is her seat. She has great snakes as her ornaments and is adorned with large earrings. Her topknot is adorned with a great Moon and the Sun is above it. She is called Anackā (Unstruck Sound) and has a copious and good menses. (As Kuṇḍalinī) she transports (the individual soul) along the path of Suṣumṇā. Endless, she is at the extreme end of the Endless. Stainless, she is free of defects”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) [=aṅgaṣaṭka?] refers to the “six Aṅgas” (of the Mṛtyuñjaya-mantra), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 2.28cd-33]—“Now, I shall explain the limbs of the mantra, with which, tied together, he achieves perfection. [...] The netra [aṅgamantra], [which is] most powerful and destroys all faults, begins with Bhairava [j], and an oṃ [and] situated with a head always in motion [y]. That astramantra is proclaimed ajīvaka [pha] joined with ṭa. The six Aṅgas (aṅgaṣaṭka) of the mantrarāṭ [i.e., the mṛtyuñjayamantra], which confers siddhis, is declared”.

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): (Shaivism)

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) refers to the “six factors” (of the rite of worshipping the Liṅga), according to the Śivadharmottara: an ancient Sanskrit text dealing with the merit generated by ritual action and methods for attaining rewards after death.—Accordingly, “If [the king] performs this rite [of worshipping the Liṅga] with its six factors (ṣaḍaṅga-vidhi) Śiva will show his favour. In both this world and the next he will grant all his desires. So a king who is a devotee of Śiva should worship him in this way. If he does so he will rescue twenty-one generations of his patriline. He will install them in heaven and then go on himself to the eternal domain of Īśvara...”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Shodhganga: Elements of Art and Architecture in the Trtiyakhanda of the Visnudharmottarapurana (shilpa)

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) refers to the “six limbs” of the ancient Indian Art of Painting, according to Vātsyāyaṇa’s Kāmasūtra.—In the Kāmasūtra, Vātsyāyaṇa mentions about the six limbs (ṣaḍaṅga) of Painting (citra) through the combination of which an art could be complete and flawless. These are—rūpabheda, pramāṇa, bhāva, lāvaṇyayojana, sādṛśya and varṇikābhaṅga.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: archive.org: Catalogue of Pancaratra Agama Texts

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) refers to one of the Nyāsas performed during the Bhūtaśuddhi (“purification of the spirits”), according to the eleventh chapter of the Agastyasaṃhitā (agastya-suīkṣṇa-saṃvāda edition), an ancient Pāñcarātra Āgama text dealing with the worship of Rāma, Sītā, Lakṣmaṇa and Hanumān.—[Cf. the bhūtaśuddhi]:—[...] Preliminary to worship, the instruments and objects used in worship are to be cleansed by prokṣaṇa and kṣālana. Only when such matters are taken care of will God be effectively worshipped; otherwise all the rites will be futile. Thereupon the nyāsas called mātṛkā, keśavādi, tattva, mūrtipañjara, ṛṣicchandas, mantradevatā, and ṣaḍaṅga are done along with repetition of their mystic syllables, after which God is to be contemplated and acknowledged by offering everything one has to Him. His retinue is also (mentally) honored. [...]

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ṣaḍaṅga (षडंग).—n S (ṣaṣ & aṅga) The six parts of the body; viz. the two arms, the two legs, the head, the waist. 2 The six supplementary parts of the Vedas; viz. grammar, prosody, astronomy, pronunciation, the meaning of unusual terms, and the ritual of the Hindu religion (vyākaraṇa, chanda, jyōtiṣa, nirukti, kalpasūtra, śikṣā).

--- OR ---

ṣaḍaṅga (षडंग).—a S Having six limbs or members. 2 Having six parts, constituents, or components.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ṣaḍaṅga (षडंग).—n The six parts of the body. The six supplementary parts of the vēda, vyākaraṇa, chanda &c. a Having six limbs or parts.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग).—(misprinted Saḍ°), name of a nāga king: Mahā-Māyūrī 246.19.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग).—mfn.

(-ṅgaḥ-ṅgī-ṅgaṃ) 1. Having six limbs or members. 2. Having six parts, six ingredients, &c. n.

(-ṅgaṃ) 1. Six parts of the body collectively; as the two arms, two legs, and the head and waist. 2. The six supplementary parts of the Vedas or grammar, prosody, astronomy, pronunciation, the meaning of unusual terms, and the ritual of the Hindu religion. E. ṣaṣ six, and aṅga a limb or part.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग).—1. [neuter] the six limbs or appendages of the Veda, i.e. the six Vedāṅgas.

--- OR ---

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग).—2. [adjective] having six limbs or six Vedāṅgas.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—Verses taken from the Vājasaneyisaṃhitā and divided into eight adhyāyās, including as a principal part the Rudrādhyāya. These mantras were used at the bathing of an image of Śiva. Paris. (D 10. 24). Ben. 9. 10. Rādh. 2 (and—[commentary]). Peters. 2, 170.
—[commentary] Oudh. Xvi, 22.
—[commentary] Rūpākhyaṣaḍaṅga by Bhaktarāma. Kāśīn. 4.
—[commentary] by Mahīdhara. B. 1, 130. Oudh. Iii, 8. Bhr. 113.

Ṣaḍaṅga has the following synonyms: Ṣaḍaṅgarudra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग):—[=ṣaḍ-aṅga] [from ṣaḍ > ṣaṣ] n. sg. the six principal parts of the body (viz. the two arms, two legs, head, and waist), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] six auspicious things id est. the six things obtained from a cow (go-mūtraṃ go-mayaṃ kṣīram, sarpir dadhi ca rocanā), [Apte’s The Practical Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

3) [v.s. ...] [plural] the six limbs or works auxiliary to the Veda, six Vedāṅgas, [Gautama-dharma-śāstra; Manu-smṛti] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] any set of six articles, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

5) [v.s. ...] = -rudra (q.v.)

6) [=ṣaḍ-aṅga] [from ṣaḍ > ṣaṣ] mfn. six-limbed, having six parts, [Brāhmaṇa; Amṛtabindu-upaniṣad; Suśruta; Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

7) [v.s. ...] having six Vedāṅgas, [Pāraskara-gṛhya-sūtra; Āpastamba; Rāmāyaṇa]

8) [v.s. ...] m. a kind of Asteracantha, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग):—[ṣaḍa+ṅga] (ṅgaṃ) 1. n. Six parts of the body collectively, viz. two arms, two legs, head and waist; the six supplementary parts of the Vedas.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Ṣaḍaṅga (षडङ्ग) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Khaḍaṃga, Saḍaṃga.

[Sanskrit to German]

Shadanga in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Saḍaṃga (सडंग) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Ṣaḍaṅga.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Ṣaḍaṃga (ಷಡಂಗ):—

1) [noun] the four divisions of human army (viz. elephants, chariots, cavalry and infantry), the army of the gods and that of Khēcaras (a class of beings who travel in the sky).

2) [noun] the six principal parts f the body (the two arms, two legs, head and waist).

3) [noun] the six things obtained from a cow (milk, curd, ghee, urine, dung and an yellow pigment prepared from its bile).

4) [noun] the six vēdangas (a group of texts dealing with six subjects that are considered essential for the understanding of the vedas).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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