Savitra, Sāvitra: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Savitra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Sāvitra (सावित्र).—One of the eleven Rudras. (Mahābhārata Śānti Parva, Chapter 208, Verse 20).

2) Sāvitra (सावित्र).—One of the eight Vasus. (Mahābhārata, Anuśāsana Parva, Chapter 150, Verse 16).

3) Sāvitra (सावित्र).—A lofty peak of the mountain Sumeru. Jyotiṣka is another name of this peak, which is not approachable. It is adorned with precious stones and is glorified by all. Śiva and Pārvatī once sat on this peak and did penance. It was on this peak that Devī Gaṅgā did penance to Śiva, assuming a divine figure. (Mahābhārata Śānti Parva, Chapter 283, Verse 5).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Sāvitra (सावित्र).—A muhūrta of the night.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 3. 43: Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 44.

1b) One of the eleven Rudras.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 5. 30; 253. 42.

1c) A mantra gaṇa.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 171. 52.

1d) The tenth Kalpa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 21. 31.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Sāvitra (सावित्र) refers to one of the 53 gods to be worshipped and given pāyasa (rice boiled in milk) according to the Vāstuyāga rite in Śaktism (cf. Śāradātilaka-tantra III-V). The worship of these 53 gods happens after assigning them to one of the 64 compartment while constructing a Balimaṇḍapa. Vāstu is the name of a prodigious demon, who was killed by 53 gods (e.g., Sāvitra).

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Savitra (सवित्र).—Cause of generation; P.III.2.184.

Derivable forms: savitram (सवित्रम्).

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Sāvitra (सावित्र).—a. (-trī f.) [सविता देवताऽस्य अण् (savitā devatā'sya aṇ)]

1) Belonging to the sun; Mb.7.157.34.

2) Descended from the sun, belonging to the solar dynasty (of kings); यत् सावित्रैर्दीपितं भूमिपालैः (yat sāvitrairdīpitaṃ bhūmipālaiḥ) U.1.42.

3) Accompanied by the Gāyatree.

-traḥ 1 The sun.

2) An embryo of fœtus.

3) A Brāhmaṇa.

4) An epithet of Śiva.

5) Of Karṇa; भ्राता भ्रातरमज्ञातं सावित्रः पाकशासनिम् (bhrātā bhrātaramajñātaṃ sāvitraḥ pākaśāsanim) (abravīt) Mb.1.136. 8;13.138.9.

-tram 1 The sacrificial thread (so called because the repetition of the Gāyatree forms a principal part of the ceremony of putting on the sacred thread); शान्तिहोमांश्च कुर्वीत सावित्राणि च धारयेत् (śāntihomāṃśca kurvīta sāvitrāṇi ca dhārayet) Mb.13.14.6.

2) The initiation into membership of the द्विज (dvija) classes (by performing the thread ceremony); Bhāg.3.12.42.

3) Name of the constellation Hasta; पञ्चतारेण संयुक्तः सावित्रेणैव चन्द्रमाः (pañcatāreṇa saṃyuktaḥ sāvitreṇaiva candramāḥ) Mb.1.135.3.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Savitra (सवित्र).—n.

(-traṃ) Cause or instrument of production or generation. E. ṣū to bear, aff. itra .

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Sāvitra (सावित्र).—m.

(-traḥ) 1. A Brahman. 2. Siva. 3. A Vasu or demigod so named. 4. The sun. 5. The embryo or fœtus. 6. Karna. f. (-trī) 1. Uma, wife of Siva. 2. The holy verse of the Vedas, the repetition of which forms an essential part of the ceremonies, enjoined to the Brahman, as daily observances: the prayer is personified as the wife of Brahma, and mystical mother of the Hindu classes, which are regenerated by investiture with the sacrificial string. 3. The wife of Satyavana. 4. A beam of light, a cluster of solar rays. 5. Descended from the sun, belonging to the solar dynasty. n.

(-traṃ) The sacrificial string, (so called owing to the repetition of the Gayatri which forms a principal part of the ceremony of wearing the sacred thread.) E. savitra the sun, and aṇ aff. of reference: the prayer is in fact addressed to that luminary, and the deities, &c. are manifestations of the planet or prayer.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sāvitra (सावित्र).—i. e. savitṛ + a, I. adj. 1. Descended from the sun, [Uttara Rāmacarita, 2. ed. Calc., 1862.] 132, 3. 2. Belonging to the dynasty descended from the sun, ib. 27, 13. Ii. m. 1. The sun. 2. Śiva. 3. A Vasu or demigod so called. 4. Karṇa, child of the sun. 5. One of the Nakṣatras, or lunar asterisms, [Johnson's Selections from the Mahābhārata.] 15, 62. Iii. f. trī. 1. A beam of light, a cluster of solar rays. 2. Umā, the wife of Śiva, [Sāvitryupākhyāna] 1, 7. 3. A proper name, [Sāvitryupākhyāna] 1, 21. 4. The name of the most holy verse of the [Rigveda.] (iii. 62, 11), [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 2, 77; 11, 191. 5. The ceremony of investiture with the sacrificial string, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 2, 38. Iv. n. The sacrificial string.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sāvitra (सावित्र).—[feminine] ī descended from, belonging or consecrated to Savitṛ; [feminine] trī (±ṛc) a cert. verse to Savitṛ.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Savitra (सवित्र):—[from sava] n. ([probably]) a cause of generation, instrument of production, [Pāṇini 3-2, 184.]

2) Sāvitra (सावित्र):—mf(ī)n. ([from] savitṛ) relating or belonging to the sun, derived or descended from the sun, belonging to the solar dynasty, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā; Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra; Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa]

3) relating to Sāvitra id est. Karṇa, [Mahābhārata]

4) accompanied or effected by the Sāvitri verse (cf. below), [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

5) m. a [particular] Agni, [Taittirīya-brāhmaṇa]

6) a [particular] kind of ladleful (cf. graha), [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa]

7) ([scilicet] homa) a [particular] oblation, [Manu-smṛti iv, 150]

8) ([scilicet] kalpa) Name of the 10th Kalpa (q.v.), [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

9) a Brāhman ([according to] to some ‘a Gṛha-stha who possesses corn in a granary’), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) an embryo or fetus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) the sun, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) a son or descendant of Savitṛ (applied to Karṇa, Candra-ketu, Śiva, one of the Vasus, one of the Maruts, and one of the Rudras), [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa; Harivaṃśa]

13) Name of one of the peaks of Meru, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

14) n. ([scilicet] havis) a [particular] oblation, [Taittirīya-saṃhitā; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa] etc.

15) initiation into membership of the twice-born classes by reciting the Sāvitri verse and investing with the sacred thread, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

16) the sacred thread (= yajñopavīta), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

17) Name of various Sāmans, [Ārṣeya-brāhmaṇa]

18) of a Pariśiṣṭa of the Yajur-veda

19) of a [particular] Muhūrta (q.v.), [Catalogue(s)]

20) of the Nakṣatra Hasta (presided over by Savitṛ), [Mahābhārata]

21) of a forest, [Mārkaṇḍeya-purāṇa]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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