Sattvata, Sāttvata: 6 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Sattvata means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Sāttvata (सात्त्वत) refers to one of the four “ways of using weapons” (releasing missiles), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 11. These ‘ways’ are known as nyāya and arise out of the various cārīs (‘dance-steps’).

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

Sāttvata (सात्त्वत).—One of the four nyāyas (ways of using weapons)—Instructions: In it the same flourishing (i.e. as in Bhārata) of the weapon and the shield holds good, but this (the flourishing of the weapon) should take place at one’s back.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Sattvata in Purana glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Sāttvata (सात्त्वत) refers to one of the sons of Kroṣṭā and grandson of Yadu, according to the Vaṃśānucarita section of the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, [...] Nahuṣa married Virajā (the daughter of Pitṛ) and was blessed with five sons of whom Yayāti was the most famous. Yayāti had two wives—Devayānī and Śarmiṣṭhā. Devayānī gave birth to Yadu and Turvasu. [...] The Son of Yadu was Kroṣṭā in whose race the most glorious kings were born. The text only names them as [viz., Sāttvata].

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sattvatā (सत्त्वता).—f.

(-tā) Purity, goodness, the existence of the Satwa-Guna, or property of truth and virtue, &c. E. tal added to the last.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sattvatā (सत्त्वता):—[=sat-tva-tā] [from sat-tva > sat] f. purity, goodness, the existence of the Sattva-guṇa, [Horace H. Wilson]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sattvatā (सत्त्वता):—(tā) 1. f. Purity; goodness.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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