Satkara, aka: Satkāra, Sat-kara; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Satkara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Jainism, Prakrit, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Satkāra (सत्कार) refers to “veneration”, as defined in the Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter XLVI.—Accordingly, “Tsouen-tchong (Satkāra ‘veneration’). – Knowing that nobody surpasses the Buddhas in virtue is tsouen; feeling for them a reverential fear surpassing that which one experiences toward one’s father, mother, master or princes, serving them and respecting them is tchong”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Satkara in Jainism glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Satkāra (सत्कार) refers to “kind treatment” and represents one of the hardships (parīṣaha), or “series of trials hard to endure” according to the Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra 10.1 (Incarnation as Nandana). While practicing penance for a lac of years, Muni Nandana also endured a series of trials hard to endure (eg., satkāra). Nandana is the name of a king as well as one of Mahāvīra’s previous births.

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra Vol-i
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Satkara in Marathi glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

satkāra (सत्कार).—m (S) Paying reverence or respect. 2 Respect, reverence, homage, honor as paid or rendered.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

satkāra (सत्कार).—m Paying respect. Reverence, respect, homage.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Satkāra (सत्कार).—

1) a kind or hospitable treatment, hospitable reception; सत्कारमानपूजार्थं तपो दम्भेन चैव यत् । क्रियते तदिह प्रोक्तं राजसं चलमध्रुवम् (satkāramānapūjārthaṃ tapo dambhena caiva yat | kriyate tadiha proktaṃ rājasaṃ calamadhruvam) || Bg.17.18.

2) reverence, respect.

3) care, attention.

4) a meal.

5) a festival, religious observance.

Derivable forms: satkāraḥ (सत्कारः).

Satkāra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sat and kāra (कार).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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