Satalaka, aka: Satālaka; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Satalaka means something in Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Satalaka in Jainism glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Satālaka (सतालक) refers to a class of piśāca deities according to the Digambara tradition of Jainism, while Śvetāmbara does not recognize this class. The piśācas refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas).

The deities such as the Satālakas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Sa-tālaka.—(EI 12), ‘together with palmyra palms’; epi- thet of gift village. Note: sa-tālaka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Relevant definitions

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Samula
Sa-mūla.—(EI 13), ‘together with the root crops’. nidhāna-alīpaka-kumārīsāhas-āputrādhana-pradh...
Varisa
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Satala
Sa-tala.—(EI 12, 29), ‘together with the surface of the ground’. Note: sa-tala is defined in th...
Sabhoga
Sābhoga (साभोग).—(sa-ābhoga, q.v.; opp. an-ābhoga, q.v.), with, accompanied or characterized by...
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Urusa
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Pancasha
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