Satala, aka: Sātalā, Saṭāla; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Satala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Sātalā (सातला):—One of the sixty-seven Mahauṣadhi, as per Rasaśāstra texts (rasa literature). These drugs are useful for processing mercury (rasa), such as the alchemical processes known as sūta-bandhana and māraṇa.

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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India history and geogprahy

Sa-tala.—(EI 12, 29), ‘together with the surface of the ground’. Note: sa-tala is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

saṭala (सटल) [or ल्ली, llī].—f (saṭa! Sound of slipping.) Slipping out of (a promise or an engagement). v khā. 2 Slipping or swerving from the truth (in narrating or declaring); storytelling. v māra, hāka.

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satala (सतल) [or लें, lēṃ].—n A metal vessel. See satēla.

--- OR ---

satāla (सताल) [or लें, lēṃ].—n A metal vessel. See satēla.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Saṭāla (सटाल).—a. Full of; Inscr.

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Sātalā (सातला).—

1) See सप्तला (saptalā).

2) A soap-tree (Mar. śikekāī).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 4463 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Tala
Tala (तल).—n. (-laṃ) 1. Essential nature, (in composition especially, as mahītalaṃ the earth it...
Masha
Māsa (मास) refers to “black gram”, which is given to the priest in the Prājāpatya ceremony, acc...
Vasa
Vaśa (वश).—mfn. (-śaḥ-śā-śaṃ) 1. Humbled, subdued, tamed, over-powered. 2. Enthralled, subdued ...
Talatala
Talātala (तलातल).—n. (-laṃ) One of the seventh divisions of the infernal regions. E. tala below...
Rasatala
Rasātala (रसातल).—n. (-laṃ) 1. Patala; the seven infernal regions under the earth, and the resi...
Samula
Samūla (समूल).—mfn. (-laḥ-lā-laṃ) Having a root, joined or in connection with the root. E. sa w...
Sha
Śa (श).—The thirtieth consonant of the Nagari alphabet and first of the three sibilants; it is ...
Shatara
Śatāra (शतार).—n. (-raṃ) The thunderbolt. E. śata a hundred, ṛ to go, aff. aṇ .
Haritala
Haritāla (हरिताल).—n. (-laṃ) Yellow orpiment. f. (-lī) 1. Bent grass, (Panicum dactylon.) 2. A ...
Talavana
1) Tālavana (तालवन).—An ancient place of Dakṣiṇa Bhārata. This place was conquered by Sahadeva....
Sutala
Sutala (सुतल).—mn. (-laḥ-laṃ) 1. A division of the lower regions, the sixth in descent. 2. Imme...
Mahatala
Mahātala (महातल).—A section of Pātāla. The descendants of the serpent Kadrū live here. These se...
Karatala
Karatala (करतल).—n. (-laṃ) The palm of the hand. E. kara, and tala lower part.--- OR --- Karatā...
Salohita
Sālohita (सालोहित).—m. (= Pali id.; Sanskrit Gr. sa-lohita plus -a), kinsman: LV 118.1; 386.12 ...
Padatala
Pādatala (पादतल).—the sole of the foot. Derivable forms: pādatalam (पादतलम्).Pādatala is a Sans...

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